Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 25, 2018 


President Trump scraps planned talks with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. Also on our Friday rundown: California lawmakers support and emergency hotline for foster kids; and boating is a booming business in states like Minnesota.

Daily Newscasts

Old-Fashioned Road Signs Advocate for E85 in Rural Wisconsin

Reminiscent of the old Burma Shave rhyming signs, new roadside signs touting the clean-air benefits of E85 are popping up all over rural Wisconsin. Credit: Clean Air Choice Team.
Reminiscent of the old Burma Shave rhyming signs, new roadside signs touting the clean-air benefits of E85 are popping up all over rural Wisconsin. Credit: Clean Air Choice Team.
August 17, 2015

MADISON, Wis. - New, sequential roadside signs reminiscent of the old "Burma Shave" signs have appeared in rural locations all over the state. These signs bring the message that ethanol fuel blend E85 is good for the air, the corn growers, and the environment.

The signs were put up by the American Lung Association's Upper Midwest Clean Air Choice Team. Tom Thieding, communications director of the Wisconsin Corn Growers Association, reads what's on the rhyming signs.

"Cleaner emissions with E85, cleaner air for your drive; use your voice to state a choice, E85 helps you stay alive; and breathe in, breathe out, cleaner air E85 is what it's about," he says.

Vehicle exhaust is the single largest source of air pollution in the Midwest, and Thieding says it was a "no-brainer" for the corn growers to join with the Clean Air Choice Team to spread the word that an 85 percent ethanol blend is a much cleaner fuel.

Most regular fuel already has ten percent ethanol content.

"One of the reasons we're using ethanol right now in the form of E10 was to replace an additive called MTBE," says Thieding. "Which was proven to have negative impacts on ground water. Ethanol is just that - it's grain ethanol, it's grain alcohol."

Thieding says ethanol burns much cleaner than traditional gasoline, reduces life-cycle carbon dioxide emissions, and is largely renewable.

According to Thieding, using E85 in a flex-fuel vehicle goes a long way toward helping keep the air clean because of its lower emissions. It's also a way to help boost the state's economy.

"About 40 percent of the corn grown in the state is made into ethanol by the nine ethanol plants in the state of Wisconsin," he says. "They make over 500 million gallons of ethanol, so it's an important market for Wisconsin corn."

Thieding acknowledges there's work to be done in educating the public about the clean-air benefits of flex-fuel vehicles and E85, but says a number of additional features help attract buyers to vehicles that run on E85.

"They like the model, they like what it is," he says. "Once we start talking about the benefits of if, the performance of it, obviously the lower price of it, they start using it."

More information is online at CleanAirChoice.org.

Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI