Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 17, 2018 


Trump says he is not buying U.S. intelligence as he meets with Putin. Also on the rundown: as harvest nears, farmers speak out on tariffs; immigrant advocates say families should not be kept in cages; and a call for a deeper dive into the Lake Erie algae troubles.

Daily Newscasts

People's Plan Calls for Clean Energy in Kentucky

A grassroots organization is seeking your input on a people's plan for clean energy in Kentucky. The Empower Kentucky project counters political leaders who are digging in against the federal government's efforts to clean up dirty power plants.
A grassroots organization is seeking your input on a people's plan for clean energy in Kentucky. The Empower Kentucky project counters political leaders who are digging in against the federal government's efforts to clean up dirty power plants.
October 21, 2015

FRANKFORT, Ky. - A grassroots organization that long has championed energy diversification in Kentucky says it will have a people's plan for clean energy in place by June.

Kentuckians For The Commonwealth has launched Empower Kentucky, an effort to develop solutions for transitioning away from coal, which currently supplies 93 percent of the state's power.

"Very important questions," said Miranda Brown of Fayette County, one of the KFTC members working on the project. "What is your vision for a bright energy future in Kentucky and what do you think it will take to move in that direction?"

The Environmental Protection Agency has given states until September to come up with preliminary plans for meeting the country's first-ever limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants. However, many of Kentucky's political leaders oppose the state writing its own plan.

Carl Shoupe, a third-generation coal-miner from Harlan County, said that makes him "angry and tremendously upset." He said he wants a proactive approach to the Clean Energy Plan.

"What's the benefit of staying on the sidelines while the rest of the world moves forward? We can do better than that," he said, "We have to do better than that."

Between now and next summer, KFTC will use listening sessions, surveys and other ways to develop what it calls a "homegrown, common-sense" clean-energy plan - a plan that member Steve Wilkins of Madison County hopes will work for all Kentuckians.

"Our people breathe cleaner air, our carbon footprint shrinks, climate impacts reverse and our economy moves," he said.

Wilkins' dream, as he calls it, faces roadblocks. Last year Kentucky lawmakers passed a bill prohibiting a shift away from coal in the state's energy mix. KFTC member Mary Love of Oldham County said that is one of many reasons why creating a people's plan is important.

"The more citizen voices are involved in this process," she said, "the more pressure that puts on the legislators to pay attention to their constituents to do, what we believe, is the right thing."

People can submit their thoughts at EmpowerKentucky.org.

Greg Stotelmyer , Public News Service - KY