PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 7, 2020 


The State Attorney of NY moves to dissolve the NRA; an update on the potential wave of pandemic evictions.


2020Talks - August 7, 2020 


The Commission on Presidential Debates rejects Trump campaign's request for a fourth debate. Hawaii has a primary tomorrow, but there are only 8 vote service centers.

Fast Food Workers Plan Tuesday National Strike

Carlton Alexander is among those planning to strike on Tuesday as part of the Fight for 15 movement. Credit: Kelly Benjamin
Carlton Alexander is among those planning to strike on Tuesday as part of the Fight for 15 movement. Credit: Kelly Benjamin
November 9, 2015

TAMPA, Fla. – If you're hoping to grab a quick burger and fries Tuesday, you may want to pack a backup lunch, as fast food workers across the state plan to take part in a nationwide strike over low wages.

Carlton Alexander of Tampa works at Taco Bell, and he is among those planning to walk off the job Tuesday.

He says his current salary of $8.05 per hour leaves him unable to move out of poverty.

"No, I'm trapped,” he states. “I'm trying to move forward at this present time, trying to go to school and better myself that way, but as far as financially, I'm pretty much trapped."

Tuesday protests are planned in 20 Florida cities, and more than 270 locations nationwide, in what some say could be the largest strike to ever hit the fast food industry.

Workers from other traditionally low wage industries, including child care, home care, and farming also plan to strike.

That includes LiAnne Flakes, who cares for children in the federal Head Start program in Tampa. She maintains her position is a calling and not just a job, but says her wages don't reflect that.

"On a daily basis we take care of other families, we're making sure that those needs are met, and at the end of the day we're not able to meet our own needs," she says.

An estimated 64 million Americans are paid less than $15 per hour, and political analysts say they could make up a powerful voting bloc.

Tuesday marks exactly one year until the presidential election.


Mona Shand, Public News Service - FL