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Trump says he is not buying U.S. intelligence as he meets with Putin. Also on the rundown: as harvest nears, farmers speak out on tariffs; immigrant advocates say families should not be kept in cages; and a call for a deeper dive into the Lake Erie algae troubles.

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Wait Continues for TN Immigrant Families

President Barack Obama, with Vice President Joe Biden, delivers remarks on immigration in the East Room of the White House, Oct. 24, 2013. Credit: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
President Barack Obama, with Vice President Joe Biden, delivers remarks on immigration in the East Room of the White House, Oct. 24, 2013. Credit: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
November 12, 2015

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The future of as many as 50,000 immigrants living in Tennessee remains uncertain.

This week the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit upheld an injunction that is preventing the implementation of immigration relief programs announced by President Barack Obama almost one year ago.

Stephanie Teatro, co-executive director of the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition, says with so much at stake it's time to take the case for Obama's executive action to the highest court.

"The programs he proposed have legal precedence and are on really solid legal footing and so we have strongly believed that this lawsuit is really politically motivated and that once it gets to the Supreme Court it will ultimately be upheld," she states.

Earlier this year, a federal judge issued a temporary injunction halting the new programs as he considered the Texas vs. United States case, the anti-immigrant lawsuit filed by 26 states, including Tennessee.

Opponents of Obama's immigration reform say it offers amnesty to individuals who have broken the law by being in the country illegally.

Teatro says it's important to note that at this point there is not an achievable path to citizenship for the thousands impacted – many of whom work, pay taxes and participate in their communities.

"There are very strict requirements about who is eligible to apply for these programs and in many ways they're actually quite narrow in terms of who's eligible," she points out.

The U.S. Constitution grants exclusive power over immigration law to the federal government, but the states contend Obama's executive action forces them to provide services to the immigrants or change state laws in order to do so.


Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - TN