Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

Daily Newscasts

KYA: Family "Best Medicine" for Foster Kids

Increasing state support for kinship care is a key recommendation in a new foster care issue brief from Kentucky Youth Advocates. Credit Greg Stotelmyer
Increasing state support for kinship care is a key recommendation in a new foster care issue brief from Kentucky Youth Advocates. Credit Greg Stotelmyer
December 3, 2015

JEFFERSONTOWN, Ky. - A leading child advocacy group in Kentucky wants the state to lift its moratorium on new enrollments in its Kinship Care Program so more financial support can go to relatives caring for children who have been removed from their parents. That is one of the recommendations in a new issue brief from Kentucky Youth Advocates.

KYA executive director Terry Brooks says it's vital children at risk of being removed from their homes continue to receive care in a family-type setting, if at all possible.

"It's a continuum," says Brooks. "We want to do everything we can to keep the family together. The next best step, in most cases, is to try to place them with a relative. Family is often the best medicine."

According to the KIDS COUNT data center the number of Kentucky children removed from their parents' care due to abuse or neglect has grown by 19 percent over the last five years. Even though the state has been moving towards using family settings more, nearly one out of every five kids in foster care is still placed in a group home or institution.

Chelsea Hoover was in both foster and kinship care from infancy until she was four. In her late teens she was in residential treatment. Now 23 and in college, Hoover says foster youth need mentors because their social workers are overworked, underpaid and often unavailable.

"Someone who is sort of neutral, outside of the environment that could provide support," says Hoover. "Just be someone to listen to, someone to be able to call."

Hoover is part of a youth advisory team for TRUE UP, a state-based initiative to help foster youth age out of care successfully.

Brooks says more than 10,000 children who are being raised by grandparents or other relatives were placed there by the state due to abuse or neglect, which he says is the wisest use of our tax dollars.

"It's not just best practice," says Brooks. "But it's a pragmatic reason to look at kinship care."

Brooks says when kinship care is not an option, a family-based home with foster parents is the next best option.

Greg Stotelmyer , Public News Service - KY