Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 21, 2018 


We’re covering stories from around the nation including a victory for safety for nuclear site workers; President Trump chastises Republicans for not securing border wall funding; and a predicted spike in population fuels concerns about the need for care.

Daily Newscasts

Report: Climate Change Could Cost Montana Dearly

A new report says if nothing is done to slow climate change, Montana's economy could lose millions over the next 40 years. (Pharmshot/iStock)
A new report says if nothing is done to slow climate change, Montana's economy could lose millions over the next 40 years. (Pharmshot/iStock)
December 21, 2015

HELENA, Mont. – According to a new report commissioned by the Montana Wildlife Federation, Montana could lose 11,000 jobs and $280 million in earnings over the next 40 years if nothing is done to slow climate change.

Researchers found that greenhouse gas emissions, mainly from the burning of fossil fuels, will lead to a 4 to 5 degree jump in average temperature in the state by the middle of the century.

Dave Chadwick, executive director of the Montana Wildlife Federation, says that will have a major impact on the Treasure State's outdoor economy.

"Stream closures will cut off our fishing season, lost hunting opportunities because of changes in snow pack and animal movement patterns, lost tourism because of wildfires, and reductions in snow pack will obviously impact Montana's ski economy," he explains.

One indication is the glaciers in Glacier National Park, which have been receding for years.

The report says Montana will see hotter, drier summers and winters with more rain and less snow.

Chadwick says that means less runoff in the spring and summer.

"Those changes are affecting fish and wildlife habitat, stream flows, wildfire patterns and even animal behavior,” he stresses. “And all of these things impact our hunting, fishing, skiing and snowmobiling."

The federal Clean Power Plan calls for efforts to clean up coal-fired power plants like Colstrip, which has some worried about jobs, but the state is looking at ways to soften that impact.



Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - MT