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Groups Hail Court’s Decision to Hear Obama Immigration Case

Promise Arizona director Petra Falcone (center, at microphone) was at a rally at the U.S. Supreme Court last week to push for the justices to hear the appeal of President Obama's executive order on immigration. (Promise Arizona)
Promise Arizona director Petra Falcone (center, at microphone) was at a rally at the U.S. Supreme Court last week to push for the justices to hear the appeal of President Obama's executive order on immigration. (Promise Arizona)
January 20, 2016

PHOENIX - Arizona immigration activists are praising the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to hear a case challenging President Obama's executive order easing some immigration rules.

According to groups such as Promise Arizona, thousands of undocumented immigrants have had their lives put on hold while a legal challenge works its way through the courts. Petra Falcone, director of Promise Arizona, said the legal question needs to be resolved.

"This will get to the Supreme Court calendar, where we hope that it will be resolved once and for all," she said. "The issue is that they are questioning the president's authority to provide an executive order, and we know that there've been many, many presidents that have used executive orders."

The president's November 2014 order allowed undocumented immigrants who are the parents of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents to avoid deportation and get work permits. The order was challenged in federal court by a coalition of 26 states, claiming the president's actions were unconstitutional.

Promise Arizona held a rally in Phoenix on Tuesday to publicize the court's decision. Falcone said one goal was to give immigrant families a chance to talk about how the delay has affected them.

"The complaint against the president's executive order was what stalled the implementation of administrative relief for up to 5 million people across the country," she said. "It would impact over 200,000 people in Arizona."

Falcone and others rallied last week in front of the Supreme Court building in Washington to encourage the justices to hear the appeal. Supreme Court officials say the case likely will be argued in April, with a decision issued by the end of June.

Details of the case are online at ca5.uscourts.gov.

Mark Richardson, Public News Service - AZ