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Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders suspends his campaign for president. And COVID-19 is ravaging the black community in some areas, including Milwaukee.

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Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders drops out of the race for president, though he assured supporters yesterday his movement will continue. A federal judge ruled this week a lawsuit in Florida awaiting trial will apply to all people with former felony convictions, not just the 17 plaintiffs.

Former Thief Has Advice on How to Avoid Being Scammed

The man whose story was told in the movie "Catch Me If You Can" will give a free presentation this month in Indianapolis on avoiding falling victim to a scam. (AARP)
The man whose story was told in the movie "Catch Me If You Can" will give a free presentation this month in Indianapolis on avoiding falling victim to a scam. (AARP)
April 13, 2016

INDIANAPOLIS - It can take a crook to catch a crook.

Frank W. Abagnale, whose unlawful exploits were portrayed in the film "Catch Me If You Can," knows all about scamming. From ages 16 to 21, Abagnale posed as airline pilot, physician and attorney, pocketing millions of dollars in bogus cash. After finally being caught, he has spent the last 40 years helping the FBI catch con artists. He's now assisting AARP Indiana by giving a free presentation about fraud.

Mandla Moyo, community outreach director for AARP Indiana, said Abagnale's advice is crucial because scammers are always eager to take your money, and they change tactics based on the season. A tax scam is circulating now in which someone calls pretending to be from the Internal Revenue Service, advising you there's a problem with your tax return. Moyo said the revenue service never tries to settle a debt over the phone.

"Then, the other thing to remember is when you're dealing with the IRS or someone saying they're calling from the IRS," Moyo said, "that there's always a way to mediate that debt in a non sort of threatening manner."

Abagnale is appearing at the Indianapolis Museum of Art on April 28. The presentation is free. Preregistration is required and can be completed at the AARP IN Frank Abagnale Fraud Event web page.

Moyo said another popular scam at this time of year centers around spring break and summer travel. A scammer calls pretending to be a child or grandchild who's been arrested in another country and needs bail money. Moyo said scammers use your emotions to manipulate you.

They "will get you scared or frightened or intimidate you," he said. They'll say " 'If you don't handle this, the sheriff will come and arrest you,' and do other things like that."

Moyo said to always get a callback number and never give out personal information over the telephone.

For additional information: AARP IN Frank Abagnale Fraud Event Indianapolis, IN (04/28/16); Register for event; AARP Indiana.

Veronica Carter, Public News Service - IN