Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to probe women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

Daily Newscasts

Report: South Dakota Could Do Better by Working Moms

When it comes to the cost of child care and employment opportunities, a new analysis shows South Dakota ranks in the middle of the pack. (iStockphoto)
When it comes to the cost of child care and employment opportunities, a new analysis shows South Dakota ranks in the middle of the pack. (iStockphoto)
May 5, 2016

PIERRE, S.D. – With Mother's Day just around the corner, new research shows working moms in South Dakota may be having a tougher time than those in about half the country.

Out of all 50 states and Washington, D.C., South Dakota ranked 25th on Wallethub's "Best and Worst States for Working Moms" report.

Analyst Jill Gonzalez says Wallethub looked at a variety of state policies and found several areas lacking.

"The area that it could definitely improve upon the most are just the median women's salary, adjusted for cost of living,” she states. “It's at $31,000 here, one of the lowest that we saw annually."

Gonzalez also says some state industries have serious gender employment gaps. For instance, in South Dakota's real estate, rental and leasing sector women make up a mere 10 percent, one of the lowest rates in the country.

But it's not all bad news. Gonzalez says South Dakota is a positive standout when it comes to women's employment rates in most industries.

"When it comes to the overall female unemployment rate, it is the fifth best in the country at just 3.7 percent," she points out.

The report also points out that child care costs in South Dakota make up a remarkably low percentage of women's monthly bills when compared to other states.

But South Dakota law does not require private employers to provide family leave, paid or unpaid. Gonzalez says that's one policy holding back the state and others from doing better by working mothers.

"When you're looking at the parental leave policy scores in each one of these states, 15 out of 50 really don't have any that are state mandated," she states.



Brandon Campbell, Public News Service - SD