Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 23, 2018 


The Mueller probe lands another cooperating witness. Also on the rundown: The GAO gives a green light for CHIP cuts; and hurricane experts say – don’t let down guard down.

Daily Newscasts

One Coal Terminal Denied as Advocates Work to Oppose Another

Les Anderson delivered 225,000 comment cards opposing a proposed coal-shipping terminal at Longview, Wash., to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Seattle. (Columbia Riverkeeper)
Les Anderson delivered 225,000 comment cards opposing a proposed coal-shipping terminal at Longview, Wash., to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Seattle. (Columbia Riverkeeper)
May 10, 2016

BILLINGS, Mont. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit on Monday for the massive Gateway Pacific Terminal, a coal-export facility proposed near Bellingham, Wash., that would have shipped coal to Asia from the Powder River Basin.

The Corps heeded complaints from the Lummi Nation that the project would harm tribal fishing rights.

In Montana, clean-energy advocates are holding a series of workshops this week to galvanize opposition to another proposal, the Millenium Bulk Terminal in Longview, Washington, partially owned by Arch Coal.

Les Anderson of Longview, vice president of Landowners and Citizens for a Safe Community, is in Montana this week for the workshops.

"It's still a real battle. This is not going to be easy to see this project go away," says Anderson. "No one can think that we're winning this. The coal company has a lot of political influence. In no way do I see this as a 'done deal.'"

The first workshop, organized by the Northern Plains Resource Council, was last night in Missoula.

There are two today in Helena and Livingston, and one on Wednesday in Billings.

The public comment period on the draft environmental impact statement on the Longview terminal opened April 29 and ends on June 13.

Anderson says the people of Montana who live along the rail lines face the same issues that worry many residents of Longview.

"From increased taxpayer costs for the new rail structures, to increased personal health-care costs for railroad neighbors with respiratory problems, this is another classic example of the coal companies making the profits, while the rest of us pay the cost," says Anderson.

The Northern Plains Resource Council says it will record all the public comments gathered in Montana, and enter them into the record at a public hearing being held by the State of Washington in Spokane on May 26.

The group says it also will send a delegation to speak at the hearing.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - MT