Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 13, 2019 


Public impeachment hearings in Washington; dreamers protest in Texas; roadless wilderness areas possibly at risk around the country; and an ozone indicating garden, at the North Carolina Governor's Mansion.

2020Talks - November 13, 2019 


Supreme Court hears DACA arguments, and likely will side with the Trump administration, but doesn't take up a gun manufacturer's appeal. Former SC Gov. Mark Sanford drops out of presidential race; and former President Jimmy Carter recovers from brain surgery.

Daily Newscasts

Remember that Sunscreen: Friday is Don't Fry Day

May is Skin Cancer Prevention Month, and Tennesseans are being reminded about the importance of proper skin protection before heading out into the sun. (LetIdeasCompete/Flickr)
May is Skin Cancer Prevention Month, and Tennesseans are being reminded about the importance of proper skin protection before heading out into the sun. (LetIdeasCompete/Flickr)
May 26, 2016

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Roughly 2,000 Tennesseans will be diagnosed with melanoma this year, based on the most recent data from the Environmental Protection Agency.

On Thursday, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention wants to remind folks about the importance of skin protection in the sun with its annual Don't Fry Day.

Dr. Lauren Ploch, a dermatologist and member of the Academy of Dermatology, says it comes down to being prepared before you head out the door.

"So, it's important to protect ourselves, especially when the weather is nice and you want to be outside,” she states. “And I'm all for being outside during the summer. I love being outside myself. I love hiking and going to the beach, but as long as you protect yourself, you can cut your risk of skin cancer exponentially."

Ploch says the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. are when sun protection is most important.

Melanoma is one of just five cancers in Tennessee with a rising death rate, taking about 200 lives every year.

And among Tennesseans ages 65 and older, melanoma has the fastest-rising cancer death rate.

The pending summer months will come on the heals of a Consumer Reports study that found not all sun screens offer the protection they promise.

Ploch says it's important to research brands before you choose one, and many people who experienced severe sun damage when they were younger incorrectly assume there's nothing they can do now to prevent skin cancer from developing.

"We definitely do get a lot of sun damage when we're younger, but it's never too late to adopt safe sun practices and protect ourselves," she points out.

In addition to good sunscreen and covering up in direct sunlight, Ploch says regular skin examinations by a doctor or dermatologist can go a long way to catch melanoma or other skin cancers before they become deadly.


Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - TN