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Local Outrage Over Supreme Court Immigration Ruling

The split decision in the U.S. Supreme Court does not set a legal precedent, but could prove to be a major setback for families of mixed immigration status. (skeeze/Pixabay)
The split decision in the U.S. Supreme Court does not set a legal precedent, but could prove to be a major setback for families of mixed immigration status. (skeeze/Pixabay)
June 24, 2016

NEW HAVEN, Conn. – Immigration advocates are expressing outrage over the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling Thursday on immigration.

The 4-to-4 tie vote allows an appeals court decision blocking President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration to stand.

The president's Deferred Action plan offered temporary protection to families with mixed immigration status and some immigrants who arrived as children.

According to Ana Maria Rivera-Forastieri, director of advocacy at Junta for Progressive Action, those actions would have applied to about 26,000 parents in Connecticut.

"Parents that are hardworking and have been waiting for a really long time for this decision,” she states. “So, we are extremely heartbroken, but at the same time, committed to continue to build our movement, to continue to seek for something that's better."

The court's ruling does not block the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA program, which remains in effect.

In January and May, Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced it would be conducting raids specifically targeting Central American families for deportation.

Rivera-Forastieri says the Supreme Court's ruling means those raids are likely to continue.

"We are actually going to be hosting some community dialogues next week, to talk about how we defend ourselves while we continue to fight for some kind of administrative relief," she states.

The tie ruling does not set a legal precedent, but it effectively prevents any executive action to protect millions from deportation for the remainder of the president's term in office.

Rivera-Forastieri says many in the immigrant community already live in fear.

"So, we can't allow fear of this decision to take over our lives,” she stresses. “We have to find that power that we have been able to build, to fight back and fight for something better."

Rivera-Forastieri says her group is committed to working for comprehensive immigration reform and securing human rights for all.



Andrea Sears, Public News Service - CT