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Efforts continue to quell the backlash over President Donald Trump’s changing statements on the Russia summit. Also on the Thursday rundown: protestors are out for Mike Pence’s visit to Missouri; and nobody wants to go, but one option is green burials.

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Could Dreamers' Voluntary Information Be Used Against Them?

Experts say immigrants who registered for DACA expected that their names and addresses would be kept confidential. (Korean Resource Center/Flickr)
Experts say immigrants who registered for DACA expected that their names and addresses would be kept confidential. (Korean Resource Center/Flickr)
July 7, 2016

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Thousands of undocumented immigrants are worried that their sign-up information for President Barack Obama's Dreamers program could now get them deported.

Last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down parts of the president's executive action means a federal judge's pending order for the release of 50,000 immigrants' names and addresses is still a threat.

The order could be upheld at an Aug. 22 hearing.

Thomas Saenz, president and general counsel for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), says the order affects only some of the millions who registered for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA program.

"One of the things that the president announced in November 2014 was that, instead of two-year terms for the DACA deferred action, there would be three-year terms,” Saenz points out. “So, it relates to those who received three-year grants."

U.S District Court Judge Andrew Hanen in Texas ordered the data released as one of several sanctions against U.S. Justice Department attorneys in a Texas-led lawsuit, which included Ohio, targeting Obama's program.

Immigrants' rights supporters say the Supreme Court's decision on June 23 has increased the deportation risk for those on the list.

Saenz says immigrants who registered for DACA had a reasonable expectation that their names and addresses would be kept confidential. He says the judge's demand has very little to do with the actual case before the court.

"It is intended as punishment for what Judge Hanen believed to be misconduct by the federal government's lawyers,” Saenz maintains. “So, the question is whether that's an appropriate sanction on lawyers, at all, and it quite clearly is not."

Saenz says forcing the Justice Department attorneys to hand over the information is unconstitutional. He adds if the order is upheld, MALDEF plans to immediately appeal it, to block any potential harm to the immigrants on the list.


Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH