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PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: more testimony on the anti-protest bill; plus we will take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

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Minimizing Fire and Flood Damage in Colorado

Air National Guard workers stack sandbags to minimize damage from floodwaters in 2013. (Wikimedia Commons/Air National Guard Staff Sgt. Nicole Manzanares)
Air National Guard workers stack sandbags to minimize damage from floodwaters in 2013. (Wikimedia Commons/Air National Guard Staff Sgt. Nicole Manzanares)
July 18, 2016

BRECKENRIDGE, Colo. - As firefighters battle wildfires that have consumed 35,000 acres so far in Colorado, national and state experts in environmental restoration gather in Breckenridge to discuss damage mitigation.

One major point of discussion at the Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference will be the fires and floods of 2012 and 2013 that caused billions of dollars in damage, said Dave Rosgen, an expert in natural water flow restoration and the owner of Wildland Hydrology. Without proper action, Rosgen said, history will repeat itself.

"It'll happen again - this is not a permanent fix,” Rosgen said. "The riprap and the boulders they're placing, they'll wash out again. What’s happened is we keep encroaching on the river and we don't give enough room for the river to flood."

"Riprap” is the term for loose stone used as a foundation in managing water flow.

Rosgen said his more than five decades of experience led him to believe that creating natural streams with wood and native materials is the best way to handle excess water.

Much of the restoration work from the wildfires of 2012 and 2013 has been effective, said Rosgen, but there is more work to be done.

"A lot of the work on the fire has been effective but is not complete,” he said. “It will take a few years to go through a lot of those priorities and take care of the problem."

Rosgen - whose company, Wildland Hydrology, was involved in the restoration assessment of the Hayman and Waldo Canyon fires - said work was done to reduce sediment that would flow into Colorado Springs in the event of a flood.

The objective of the conference - hosted by Resource Institute - is to bring together the people working on mitigation and restoration of floods and fires to exchange ideas on how to utilize the latest research to handle problems.

"When we try to fool mother nature by going in and straightening and lining and levying and putting up berms and hardening banks with riprap,” said Rosgen, "we're getting away from the natural process and stable-functioning river systems."

To learn more, visit rockymountainstream.org.

Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - CO