Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 24, 2019 


President Trump's reported to be ready to sign disaster relief bill without money for border security. Also on the Friday rundown: House bills would give millions a path to citizenship; and remembering California’s second-deadliest disaster.

Daily Newscasts

Can Trump Win Over Kasich's Delegates?

Twenty-two percent of Ohio's Republican delegates said in a Columbus Dispatch survey that they would not vote for Donald Trump for president. (Republican National Convention)
Twenty-two percent of Ohio's Republican delegates said in a Columbus Dispatch survey that they would not vote for Donald Trump for president. (Republican National Convention)
July 19, 2016

CLEVELAND - The Republican National Convention is in full swing in Cleveland, but the state's delegates are not necessarily welcoming the presumptive nominee with open arms. A recent Columbus Dispatch survey of the state's delegates and alternates found 19 percent are not at all enthused with Trump. It's a feeling first-time delegate and Lima business owner Tracie Sanchez said she understands.

"A lot of people he does rub the wrong way, but when it's all said and done, I think he will surround himself with very smart people who will make the right decisions," she said.

While she punched her ticket for Governor John Kasich at the primary, Sanchez said she's committed to the party.

Stark County Commissioner Janet Weir Creighton, who also is a delegate, shares the same sentiment. But she notes voters are frustrated with establishment candidates, which could work in Trump's favor.

"I get it, I hear what they're saying," Creighton said. "They're angry, they want change, and in this election you're attracting people who have really never come out to vote before or people that have taken part in the process."

According to the Columbus Dispatch survey, 22 percent of Ohio's delegates said they would not vote for Trump to be the Republican nominee for president.

This is the fifth convention for Creighton, who said the GOP needs to come together and put its best foot forward in order to take back the White House.

"It only takes one small reason not to vote for somebody, but as long as you keep telling the story over and over and offering them a new hope and a different approach, that's what will appeal to people," she said.

Eighty-five percent of survey respondents said Trump was not the best possible candidate to head the GOP ticket. Sanchez contends that Trump's selection of Indiana Governor Mike Pence might help ease their concerns.

"People are worried, especially the people in Washington D.C. because he's not going to take back-door deals. The government is a business and hopefully he'll run it like that," Sanchez said.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH