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Moral Day of Action Reaches Kentucky Capitol

The Kentucky Capitol is one of many across the country where today, clergy and activists will rally against what they see as "extremist" policies. (Greg Stotelmyer)
The Kentucky Capitol is one of many across the country where today, clergy and activists will rally against what they see as "extremist" policies. (Greg Stotelmyer)
September 12, 2016

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Today is Moral Day of Action at the State Capitol in Frankfort, as well as other capitols across the country with leaders of different faiths joining advocates and activists in a call for lawmakers and candidates to move away from what they see as "regressive, extremist" policies.

The Rev. Peggy Hinds, executive director of the Kentucky Council of Churches, helped to organize the movement in the Bluegrass State.

"Morality for us has more to do with equity and justice, particularly for people who don't often have a voice," she states.

Access to health care and criminal justice reform are among the issues Hinds says Kentucky’s political leaders should approach as moral issues.

A march at 10:30 a.m. will end with a rally at the Capitol building at 11 a.m.

Hinds says many conservative evangelical groups place their moral focus on individual sin.

"We try to focus on some of the systemic issues that cause people to live in poverty, that cause people to not have the basic needs that they need," she explains.

The architect of the Forward Together Moral Movement is Rev. William Barber II, a North Carolina pastor.

Barber advocates for a "revolution of moral values" to resist what he maintains is a divide-and-conquer strategy by extremists. Instead, he wants leaders to look at public policy through what he calls "the moral lens of justice for all."

"How do your policies treat the poor, those on the margins?” he asks. “How are they fair to immigrants? How do they treat the least of these – women, children, workers, the sick?"

Barber maintains extremist policies are, in his words, "morally indefensible and economically insane."

He is taking that message across the country, and is scheduled to speak in Louisville in early October.


Greg Stotelmyer , Public News Service - KY