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PNS Daily Newscast - September 20, 2019 


A whistleblower complaint against President Trump sets off tug-of-war between Congress and the White House; and students around the world strike today to demand action on climate change.

2020Talks - September 20, 2019. (3 min.)  


Climate change is a big issue this election season, and global climate strikes kick off, while UAW labor strikes continue.

Daily Newscasts

Will the Next President be a "Great Lakes President?"

A poll found Great Lakes voters would be less likely to vote for a presidential candidate promising cuts to restoration funds for Lake Erie and the other Great Lakes. (Sam DeLong/Flickr)
A poll found Great Lakes voters would be less likely to vote for a presidential candidate promising cuts to restoration funds for Lake Erie and the other Great Lakes. (Sam DeLong/Flickr)
September 20, 2016

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Whether it is Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, a broad coalition is hoping that whoever takes the White House is a "Great Lakes president." At the 12th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference kicking off today in Sandusky, advocates will call on both campaigns to make protecting the Great Lakes a presidential priority.

Todd Ambs, the campaign director for the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition explained that includes supporting the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which has spurred nearly 3,000 projects in the region over the past seven years.

"We've really seen a lot of tremendous progress on some of the challenges facing the Great Lakes, we have much more work to do," he said. "There's no question that there are significant challenges that remain, but we've really seen some good progress."

Great Lakes protection has received support from former President George W. Bush and President Barack Obama, as well both Republicans and Democrats in Congress. Representatives from the Clinton and Trump campaigns are to speak at the conference on Thursday during a campaign forum, which will be broadcast live on Facebook.

Kristy Meyer, managing director of natural resources with the Ohio Environmental Council, said the Flint water crisis and the 2014 algal bloom in western Lake Erie that poisoned Toledo's water supply highlight the need for clean water investments. And she believes the next president should stand up for the millions of people who depend on the Great Lakes for drinking water, jobs, and recreation.

"Looking at the things that this region has been dealing with over the past couple of years between toxic algae and lead, drinking water issues," she said. "I would think it would be in the best interest of the president to pay attention to the health of such a large population."

A 2016 poll of voters in Great Lakes states found more than 6-in-10 strongly support continued funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. It also revealed voters would be less likely to vote for a presidential candidate promising cuts to federal restoration funds.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH