Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: more testimony on the anti-protest bill; plus we will take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

Daily Newscasts

Montanans Celebrate National Public Lands Day by Giving Back

Nearly one-third of the land in Montana is publicly owned, and National Public Lands Day is a chance for those who use it to help with cleanup and maintenance projects. (Bureau of Land Management/Flickr)
Nearly one-third of the land in Montana is publicly owned, and National Public Lands Day is a chance for those who use it to help with cleanup and maintenance projects. (Bureau of Land Management/Flickr)
September 23, 2016

HELENA, Mont. – Saturday is the 23rd annual celebration of National Public Lands Day, which gives Montanans a chance to visit and explore the Treasure State's bountiful public lands free of charges for parking or passes parks might require. Covering nearly a third of the state, Montanans make good use of the state's public lands.

According to the Outdoor Industry Association, outdoor recreation generates nearly $6 billion and is the second-biggest contributor to the economy.

Kate Sheridan, a former member of the Montana Wilderness Association, said some Montanans give back to parks on Public Lands Day.

"A lot of people will do projects, especially trail work or something to clean up a favorite outdoor area," she said. "It's a really important day to be thinking about this incredible national treasure we have in our public land."

More than 30 percent of land in the United States is publicly owned, from national forests to Bureau of Land Management lands, to state parks.

According to the U.S. Forest Service, the country loses more than two million acres of open spaces per year, in some cases to housing or energy projects such as oil and gas drilling and coal extraction, which are also important job sources. Sheridan said one of the beauties of public lands is that they provide us with a respite from our busy schedules and city lives.

"Where I grew up, we had this beautiful backyard and it turned into a subdivision," she added. "So, I think in this day and age, when we're dealing with very stressful jobs, tightly-packed cities and all of that, we get to go out and be on these public lands and kind of refresh and renew."

Events are planned across the state to help clean up and maintain Montana's public lands.

Find events by state here.

Support for this reporting was provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - MT