PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 11, 2021 


We reflect and update as HIV/AIDS first came to national attention 40 years ago this month; and when it comes to infrastructure spending, bipartisanship isn't dead yet.


2021Talks - June 11, 2021 


President Biden offers up more COVID-19 vaccines to the world; Dems and GOP close in on an infrastructure deal; and Speaker Pelosi tries to quell a spat over the Middle East among Democrats.

Christian Progressives Speak Up in Advance of Election

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Progressive Christians say they're beginning to speak out in increasing numbers about their policy views and the ways they are rooted in their faith. (thelesleyshow/morguefile)
Progressive Christians say they're beginning to speak out in increasing numbers about their policy views and the ways they are rooted in their faith. (thelesleyshow/morguefile)
 By Stephanie Carson/Scott Herron, Contact
October 20, 2016

RALEIGH, N.C. – Sparks flew and tempers flared Wednesday night in the final presidential debate.

And while much attention has been given during the campaign to the views of voters who identify themselves as Christian, as it turns out, that's a broad spectrum, in North Carolina and across the country.

While some people may assume that Christians and conservatives go hand in hand, a growing number of voters insist that isn't always the case.

Robert Mullis attends a Baptist church in Charlotte and says he views policy discussions through his faith, and has formed a political position that runs counter to the stereotype.

"People from the pulpit bring up hate, and I hear people use religion to espouse inequality,” he states. “That distresses me, and I have to just try to live my life, in touching the people I touch, to express my beliefs, and let that spread."

According to the Pew Research Center, 56 percent of so-called mainline Protestants identify politically as Democratic or nonpartisan, and 46 percent of evangelicals fall into that same category.

Jennifer Copeland, executive director of the North Carolina Council of Churches, a group that identifies with more progressive churches, says she and others are working to reclaim language that has long been absorbed into more conservative circles.

"The progressive Christian voice can no longer sit at home and expect people to come into our sanctuaries to hear what we have to say about progressive Christian values,” she states. “We've simply got to get out into the streets and tell our story."

Mullis says he respects the political opinions of others in his religion that lean further to the right, but is mindful that they're all reading the same Bible.

"We're looking at the love that Jesus taught, and how that's found in the gospels,” he points out. “And that's sort of the message that I get from Jesus is, that's the basic golden rule – love one another."



Best Practices