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Researchers Warn of Dire Consequences in Partial ACA Repeal

A new report warns 371,000 Nevadans, including many children, could lose health coverage by 2019 under a partial Affordable Care Act repeal. (D. Marshall/iStockphoto)
A new report warns 371,000 Nevadans, including many children, could lose health coverage by 2019 under a partial Affordable Care Act repeal. (D. Marshall/iStockphoto)
December 12, 2016

CARSON CITY, Nev. – If Congress repeals parts of the Affordable Care Act without replacing it, the number of uninsured Americans would more than double by 2019 – reaching almost 59 million, according to a new report from the Urban Institute.

Analysts looked at what would happen if Congress follows through on proposals to use a reconciliation bill to eliminate Medicaid expansion, the individual mandate, and federal financial assistance for coverage through state insurance marketplaces.

Denise Tanata, executive director of the Children's Advocacy Alliance in Nevada, says the cuts would be devastating.

"The estimate is that Nevada would stand to lose over $1 billion in Medicaid and CHIP funding, and over $312 million in marketplace assistance – just in 2019, in the one year," she explains.

The research says under a partial repeal, 371,000 Nevadans would lose coverage by 2019, almost doubling the number of uninsured. It says the state also would lose more than $16 billion in federal funding over 10 years.

Tanata adds that a repeal would eviscerate gains made in the past two years to get children insured, when Nevada posted the highest percent increase in children's coverage in the country.

Joan Alker, executive director of the Center for Children and Families at Georgetown University, wants Congress to carefully consider the consequences of a hasty repeal.

"We need our congressional leaders to do the hard work of negotiating a replacement plan before they simply create chaos by repealing what's in place," she states.

The report also found that 82 percent of those losing health insurance coverage would be in working families, mostly non-Hispanic whites without college degrees.


Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - NV