Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 20, 2018 


A deadly shooting at a Chicago hospital. Also on the Tuesday rundown: community health centers rise to the challenge after wildfires; plus food inspectors can keep your Thanksgiving meal hearty and healthy

Daily Newscasts

NV Groups Praise Designation of New National Monuments

Nevada advocates defend President Obama's decision to designate additional national monuments the same way he recently designated Gold Butte, using the Antiquities Act. (Friends of Gold Butte)
Nevada advocates defend President Obama's decision to designate additional national monuments the same way he recently designated Gold Butte, using the Antiquities Act. (Friends of Gold Butte)
January 13, 2017

CARSON CITY, Nev. - President Obama has taken another major stand for public lands, designating three new national monuments and expanding two others late Thursday. He also issued a presidential memorandum encouraging diversity in the national parks and monuments.

Thursday's action brings to 34 the total number of monuments Obama has created or enlarged using the Antiquities Act.

Mauricia Baca, executive director of the Outside Las Vegas Foundation, praised the moves, which come only a few weeks after Obama designated Nevada's Gold Butte as a national monument.

"This is a place that has a tremendous legacy of cultural significance for our native community," she said, "and it also serves to establish simply a fantastic natural place that our communities can celebrate and enjoy."

The three new national monuments all are related to the civil rights movement, including two in Alabama - the Birmingham and Freedom Riders national monuments - and Reconstruction Era National Monument on St. Helena Island in South Carolina. Obama also expanded California Coastal and Cascade Siskiyou national monuments on the Oregon-California border.

While the presidential memorandum isn't binding, said Carolyn Finney, author of "Black Faces, White Spaces" and a member of the National Park System Advisory Board, it advises agencies to consider diversity in how they engage the public.

"We need our public lands to survive," she said. "It's not simply about going and having a place to recreate, but that our public lands actually tell us something about who we are as Americans, what our history is."

Next week, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee is to consider President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for Interior secretary. U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke, R-Mont., has opposed use of the Antiquities Act to create new national monuments.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - NV