PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 21, 2020 


COVID-19 reported to be on the rise in more than 30 states; and will Supreme Court nomination tilt U.S. Senate races?


2020Talks - September 21, 2020 


Biden pays tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Trump plans to announce his replacement nominee this week. Plus, early voting in four states.

NC Bill Threatens Rights of Citizens, Opponents Say

A law before the State Assembly would reclassify any assault of a North Carolina police officer as a hate crime, which presents its own consequences for some communities. (Victor/flickr.com)
A law before the State Assembly would reclassify any assault of a North Carolina police officer as a hate crime, which presents its own consequences for some communities. (Victor/flickr.com)
March 27, 2017

RALEIGH, N.C. — At first glance, the First Responders Act of 2017 currently being considered by the state House seems to have the noblest of intentions: It offers tax breaks for firefighters and rescue workers, exempts widows of emergency personnel from paying property taxes, and establishes funding for emergency workers who find themselves in financial need.

But the bill includes another provision that's concerning to citizens like Robert Dawkins, director at the SAFE Coalition of North Carolina. Within the legislation is a proposal to make crimes against police officers a felony hate crime

"They're putting this into the bill that has some protections and things for law enforcement, but then they tack this 'Blue Lives Matter' part down in the bill, and so when groups like us try to fight it, it's hard,” Dawkins said.

Opponents argue there already are laws on the books offering extra protection for officers and stringent punishment of offenders. Dawkins said the bill unfairly targets members of African American and marginalized communities by making them vulnerable to prosecution.

Ian Mance, staff attorney at the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, said labeling acts against police hate crimes could easily be abused.

"This proposal that would allow them to elevate these skirmishes into felony hate crime charges essentially really, I think, changes the dynamic in an unhelpful way,” Mance said.

Dawkins explained how the provision would put minority communities at additional risk.

"Every time that somebody is in an interaction with a police officer, it can pretty much be deemed a hate crime,” he said.

Opponents add that current North Carolina hate crime law does not offer protection to members of the LGBTQ community.

Similar bills have been proposed in other Southern states, including one that just passed in Kentucky last week and another that was introduced in Mississippi.

Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - NC