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More than 1,200 missing in the California wildfires. Also on the Monday rundown: A pair of reports on gun violence in the nation; and concerns that proposed changes to 'Green Card' rules favor the wealthy.

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Opposition Remains for Revised GOP Health-Care Bill

Paul Ryan and the GOP have released a new version of the American Health Care Act, and could hold a vote on it this week. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty)
Paul Ryan and the GOP have released a new version of the American Health Care Act, and could hold a vote on it this week. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty)
April 28, 2017

PORTLAND Ore. – An amended version of the GOP health-care bill was rumored to get a vote as soon as today, despite outcry from many of the same groups that opposed the original version of the bill.

In Congress, Democrats are threatening a government shutdown if Republicans bring the American Health Care Act up for a vote before voting on a budget plan.

Joyce DeMonnin is the communications director for AARP Oregon.

"We think the American Health Care Act is a bad bill that just keeps getting worse for older adults, and it's just a shame that we're playing games with people's lives," she says.

Under the revised American Health Care Act, states could allow insurers to charge people with preexisting conditions higher premiums. It would also allow states to opt out of the individual mandate that requires people to get health coverage put into place under Obamacare.

AARP is also opposed to the legislation because it still contains a so-called "age tax." Under the current system, insurance companies can only charge older Americans three times what they charge younger people. That cap is lifted under the AHCA.

And according to DeMonnin, this bill does not address the increasing cost of healthcare.

"AARP believes that Congress should be addressing the skyrocketing costs of health care, and especially prescription drugs, instead of boosting profits for drug companies and insurance companies," she adds.

DeMonnin says she and her organization are also frustrated because the bill includes an exemption for members of Congress, so that they cannot be charged higher premiums for pre-existing conditions.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - OR