PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 15, 2021 


Enbridge Energy wins a round on the Line 3 pipeline, but tribal activists say they'll keep fighting, and President Biden issues a warning to Russian leader Vladimir Putin.


2021Talks - June 15, 2021 


The U.S. has seen more than 270 mass shootings in 2021 as lawmakers argue over causes and strategies, President Biden previews his meeting with Vladimir Putin, and Novavax says its COVID-19 vaccine is 90% effective.

Experts Encourage Expanded Vision Screenings for AZ Kids

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Financial barriers can prevent parents from scheduling a follow-up eye exam after a vision screening detects a problem with their child's eyesight. (Joe Whited/Flickr)
Financial barriers can prevent parents from scheduling a follow-up eye exam after a vision screening detects a problem with their child's eyesight. (Joe Whited/Flickr)
 By Mary KuhlmanContact
October 23, 2017

PHOENIX – Eyes are windows for learning, and when children can't see well, their education can suffer.

Benita Loy, health services coordinator for the Washington Elementary School District, says the earlier a sight problem is detected, the better.

But only about 27 percent of Arizona children ages five and under receive vision screenings, which is the lowest figure in the nation.

Loy contends there should be a statewide mandate for vision screenings in schools, just like there is for hearing.

"To where they actually are making people accountable for their care, both from physicians reporting the results all the way to the school screeners,” she stresses. “If they have to report to an organization, then things get done."

The state recommends but doesn't require vision screenings for children every year through fourth grade, and then every other year, beginning in fifth grade, and for new students and children who receive special education services.

It's estimated that 5 percent of Arizona preschoolers and 1 in 4 school-aged children have problems with their vision.

Loy says school is the ideal place for eyesight screenings since that's where children spend most of their day.

But when a problem is detected, she notes there are barriers that can prevent a child from receiving a follow-up exam from an eye doctor.

"Lack of transportation, lack of being able to afford the glasses,” she explains. “The other thing could be that the parent doesn't have time to take off work, because they're afraid of losing their job. There's a lot of issues surrounding why children do not receive glasses.”

Loy explains education vouchers sponsored by private businesses and organizations can help relieve some of the financial barriers for families and ensure that children are able to see clearly.

Her district has had a sharp increase recently in children receiving eye exams, with more than 700 vouchers awarded to families from Visionworks.


Best Practices