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PNS Daily Newscast - May 21, 2018 


Giuliani now says the Mueller probe into whether President Trump obstructed the Russian collusion inquiry will end by September. Also on the rundown: Healthcare providers gear up as Trump's new "Gag Rule" targets Planned Parenthood; and some perspective on the administration’s push for Arctic oil.

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Bay Trust: More Things You Can Do to Save the Bay

Chesapeake Bay Trust encourages the public to purchase Chesapeake Bay plates to help restore the bay and other natural resources in the region. (BelindaMariepix/Flickr)
Chesapeake Bay Trust encourages the public to purchase Chesapeake Bay plates to help restore the bay and other natural resources in the region. (BelindaMariepix/Flickr)
November 2, 2017

ANNAPOLIS, Md. --The ongoing multi-million dollar effort to clean up Chesapeake Bay finally is starting to pay off. State scientists found fewer water samples showing the presence of so-called dead zones that can't support aquatic life.

While bay advocates praise the success of the coordinated clean-up efforts, Janna Davis, executive director at the Chesapeake Bay Trust, said there are simple things people can do to help keep the bay alive.

"Practices that one can do on one's own property at very low costs: Plant a tree, put a rain barrel in; rain barrels can cost $50 and it's something that can capture the water coming from your roof,” Davis said. "You can also do things like buy a bay plate."

Proceeds from the bay license plates go toward grants to help plant more trees, purchase community rain gardens and create educational programs so children can understand issues with stormwater runoff and ways to keep the environment clean.

Stormwater runoff is a major source of pollution into the bay, but Davis said preventing runoff helps more than just the bay area.

"It's basically anything that we as humans put on the land surface can get carried into the bay or the streams when it rains,” she said. “And we have to be very conscious about what rain is really carrying into our streams and bays. "

Like most coastal areas, Chesapeake Bay is heavily dependent on its natural ecosystem, which is a major draw for tourists. Davis said a healthier bay and healthier watershed means a healthier local economy.

Trimmel Gomes, Public News Service - MD