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South Dakota Ready for Women's March 2.0

South Dakota cities saw some of the largest demonstrations anyone could remember when the first Women's March was held last year following President Trump's inauguration. (listen.sdpb.org)
South Dakota cities saw some of the largest demonstrations anyone could remember when the first Women's March was held last year following President Trump's inauguration. (listen.sdpb.org)
January 19, 2018

RAPID CITY, S.D. – One year after President Donald Trump was sworn into office, South Dakota women, men and families will be marching on both ends of the state – and at the State Capitol – tomorrow as part of the second Women's March.

Rapid City resident Suzanne Ludicello was in the nation's capital for last year's Women's March on Washington, but says she'll march with her South Dakota neighbors tomorrow. She says if the first march was inspirational, this year it should be an invocation to action.

"I think it's important to march again to remind ourselves how inspiring and profound it was to march the first time,” she says. “But at the same time, we've seen this resistance, if you will, turn into action."

The Rapid City march starts at 10 a.m. at the Central High School parking lot. And in Sioux Falls, marchers will set off from Carnegie Town Hall, also at 10 a.m.

Events are also planned in Pierre and Vermillion.

Organizers say this year's Women's March celebrates accomplishments achieved over the past year, and Ludicello hopes it is also an incentive for people to get involved politically, before the midterm elections.

"I know that there will be voter registration tables at the march, and that's probably the most important thing we can do," says Ludicello.

About 1,000 people marched in Rapid City last year and 3,000 in Sioux Falls – some of the largest state demonstrations anyone could remember.

To Ludicello, the second march signifies how much energy has been generated in recent years around women's rights and human rights.

"The activists that turned out in 2016 – still registering voters, they're going to meetings, they're posting on issues, they're attending town halls,” she says. “I have a huge amount of confidence in the young women. I really think they're going to kick up some dust."

More than two million people participated in the global event last year, with 673 marches across the United States and in 32 countries.

Roz Brown, Public News Service - SD