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PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

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Chesapeake Bay Trust Seeks New Ideas for "Mini Grants"

Activities such as tree plantings and community cleanups are on the list of projects eligible for grant funding through the Chesapeake Bay Trust. (Ben Hyman/Pigtown Main Street)
Activities such as tree plantings and community cleanups are on the list of projects eligible for grant funding through the Chesapeake Bay Trust. (Ben Hyman/Pigtown Main Street)
April 13, 2018

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – If you've got a great idea for how to clean up the environment and are in need of funding to bring that idea to life, you could be awarded up to $5,000 through the Chesapeake Bay Trust. The Trust's "Mini Grant Program for Community Engagement" hopes to award roughly $200,000 in small grants this year.

If an organization has never applied for a grant before, that's actually a big plus – in this case, it increases the chances of winning. BréAnna Brooks is the coordinator who manages the grant program, and says applicants have made rain gardens, cleaned up streams and more.

"So folks who are interested in receiving funding for an eligible project should visit the Chesapeake Bay Trust website, which is cbtrust.org, navigate their way to the Community Engagement Mini Grant program and fill out an online application," says Brooks.

Projects like "Bloom the Boulevard," a community greening day in Pigtown, Md., are among the past recipients. Brooks says grant requests are handled on an ongoing basis as long as funding is available.

She adds part of the goal is to educate and encourage new people to get out into the environment and find ways to make things better. So, they're looking for a variety of groups with fresh ideas to apply.

"And those audiences are the faith-based community, the health sector, and communities of color,” says Brooks. “So, I just think it's really important for folks to know the intention of us trying to engage new audiences."

Brooks says some of the grant recipients have restored tidal marshes, planted native grasses and trees, and done major cleanups of local parks and neighborhoods.

Trimmel Gomes, Public News Service - MD