Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to probe women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

Daily Newscasts

MT Shares Grizzly Kills with WY for State's Proposed Hunt

One more female and male grizzly bear could be killed during Wyoming's hunting season this fall because of a transfer from Montana. (Neal Herbert/Yellowstone National Park)
One more female and male grizzly bear could be killed during Wyoming's hunting season this fall because of a transfer from Montana. (Neal Herbert/Yellowstone National Park)
April 25, 2018

HELENA, Mont. - Conservation groups say Montana is sharing its grizzly bear mortality quota so that more bears can be killed in Wyoming's proposed hunt this fall, despite Montana's decision not to allow a grizzly hunt this year and its stated commitment not to transfer the mortality figures to other states.

Nicholas Arrivo, a staff attorney for the Humane Society of the United States, said Wyoming essentially will "round up" its numbers so that one more female and male can be hunted this year. He said HSUS only found out about the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks' transfer after asking a Wyoming Game and Fish representative why that state's hunting quota exceeded its limit.

"There was no public process," he said. "The Fish, Wildlife and Parks department did not say anything about this having happened. It was sort of left to conservation organizations to incidentally stumble on this fact at a meeting in a different state."

Following grizzly bears' removal last year from the Endangered Species list, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming agreed to jointly manage the approximately 700 grizzlies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Multiple groups, including the Humane Society, Sierra Club and Center for Biological Diversity, have asked the Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission to rescind the transfer. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks did not respond to a request for comment.

Under averages from the tri-state agreement, Wyoming is allowed to hunt 1.5 female grizzlies and 9.8 males, so it originally set the limit for females at one. With Montana's transfer, the limit is now two.

The hunt would end as soon as the female quota is reached. Arrivo said that's because the state recognizes how crucial female bears are to the population, since the species is slow to reproduce and has a high rate of cub deaths.

"Removing even a few additional adult females from the population, on top of what is already a very aggressive hunting approach coming from the tri-state memorandum, could mean the difference between serious genetic problems and potential recovery," he said.

Wyoming is accepting public comments on its proposed hunt through Monday and will announce its decision on May 23. Idaho also is considering a hunt this season, and is accepting public comments until May 3.

The letter to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is online at files.acrobat.com.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - MT