Thursday, August 11, 2022

Play

A new report says Georgia should step up for mothers and infants, Oregon communities force a polluter to shut down, and we have an update on the FBI's probe of Trump allies, including Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa.

Play

Inflation could be at a turning point, House members debate the expansion of the IRS, and former President Donald Trump invokes the Fifth Amendment in a deposition over his business practices.

Play

Infrastructure funding is on its way, ranchers anticipate money from the Inflation Reduction Act, and rural America is becoming more diverse, but you wouldn't know it by looking at the leadership.

Push to Raise Smoking Age Heads to Rauner's Desk

Play

Tuesday, June 5, 2018   

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – A bill headed for Gov. Bruce Rauner's desk would make Illinois the sixth state in the country to raise the minimum age for purchasing tobacco products from 18 to 21.

Senate Bill 2332 narrowly passed the Illinois House last week after an initial failed effort. Opponents, including the Illinois Chamber of Commerce, claim the state could lose millions of dollars in tax revenue, which would then go to other states.

However, Kevin O'Flaherty, director of advocacy for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, says the increase will lead to a healthier population over time.

"The research does show that this will be effective, and over time we will see significant reductions in smoking among the entire population as well," he says.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 90 percent of smokers tried their first cigarette by age 18.

O'Flaherty also points to other studies by the American Lung Association, which estimates boosting the legal age to buy tobacco by those three years would result in a 25-percent drop in smoking rates among teens ages 14 to 17.

"It's not designed to force current smokers, even 19- and 20-year-olds, really to quit," he notes. "It's about preventing today's younger students, 15- to 17-year-olds and those younger than that as they age up, from having easy access to tobacco products as they do now."

More than 20 municipalities in Illinois had already raised the minimum age to purchase tobacco to 21, but the requirement will be statewide if Rauner signs the bill into law.


get more stories like this via email

Pictured in the center is Francine "Fran" Pace, one of 11 graduates of this summer's Youth Leadership Academy for Iowans with disabilities. (Photo courtesy of DD Council).

Health and Wellness

Nearly a dozen Iowa youths with disabilities are taking newly developed leadership skills out into the world. A summer academy wrapped up this month…


Environment

A coalition of community organizations teamed up in Oregon to force a chronic polluter out of business, and bring environmental justice to a nearby …

Social Issues

As parts of Southern California suffer with triple-digit temperatures, state lawmakers are set to vote today on two bills to study and mitigate heat …


Nearly half of Hispanic or Latina women of reproductive age in Georgia are uninsured. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

While abortion care is in the headlines, a new report says accessing other health-care services is a challenge for many women in Georgia. Data from …

Environment

Hunters, landowners and wildlife managers are gathering in Montana to discuss the need for novel approaches to elk management. The 2022 Elk …

Summit Carbon solutions has been seeking voluntary land agreements with private property owners in multiple states for its underground carbon storage project. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

Next week, North Dakota landowners will get a chance to hear updates on a proposed underground pipeline for transporting and sequestering carbon …

Social Issues

With Virginia's Rent Relief Program ending, a flood of eviction cases has emerged. Established during the pandemic, the program was designed to help …

Environment

As Congress debates a bill to fund climate-change solutions, Pima Community College is doing its own work to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021