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PNS Daily Newscast - September 24 


Update: A second accuser emerges with misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavenaugh. Also on the Monday rundown: We take you to a state where more than 60,000 kids are chronically absent from school; and we'll let you know why the rural digital divide can be a two-fold problem.

Daily Newscasts

Spotlight Back On ACA Provision to End Pre-Existing Conditions

Fifty-five percent of the 200,000 eligible uninsured New Mexicans are Hispanic, with 21 percent Native American and 21 percent Anglo, according to the Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce. (sojourners.net)
Fifty-five percent of the 200,000 eligible uninsured New Mexicans are Hispanic, with 21 percent Native American and 21 percent Anglo, according to the Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce. (sojourners.net)
June 19, 2018

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – It's a long, bumpy road ahead for the Department of Justice, which is arguing against the Affordable Care Act in federal court. The DOJ wants to end provisions that require insurance companies to accept all applicants, and end insurance for people with preexisting conditions.

A new Kaiser Family Foundation poll shows 70 percent of Americans want to keep that protection.

Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow with the foundation, says without it, insurance companies could opt to end coverage for any number of ailments.

"It didn't have to be something serious like HIV or diabetes," she notes. "It could be allergies, it could be earaches in little kids, really any health condition. It's kind of part of the human condition at some point to have some health problem."

Last week, New Mexico's largest health care provider - Presbyterian Healthcare Services - said it was seeking to re-enter the state's federally subsidized insurance exchange after a two-year absence. If approved, New Mexico's health insurance options would increase to five.

The ACA has survived nearly 70 unsuccessful repeal attempts in Congress since it was passed in 2010.

According to Pollitz, the Affordable Care Act will continue to be a hot topic as local elections come up.

"Now the Trump administration has said that they will not defend the law, so it's going to be kind of a battle of the states in federal court over the constitutionality of these market reforms," she adds.

Kaiser estimates that 27 percent of Americans under the age of 65 had medical conditions that could have led insurers to deny them coverage before the ACA. Fifty-five percent of the 200,000 eligible uninsured New Mexicans are Hispanic, with 21 percent Native American and 21 percent Anglo, according to the Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce.

Roz Brown, Public News Service - NM