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Farmers in DC to discuss trade and the rural economic crisis; also Lily Bohlke reports on the Democratic debate -- from 2020 Talks.

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Last night in Ohio the fourth Democratic debate covered issues from health care, gun control and abortion to the Turkish invasion of Syria. What's clear: Sen. Elizabeth Warren has replaced former VP Joe Biden as the centerstage target.

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Video Prompts Calls for Change in Nashville Police Procedures

Community groups in Nashville are calling for policy changes after the fatal police shooting of a 25-year-old black man in July. (Twenty20)
Community groups in Nashville are calling for policy changes after the fatal police shooting of a 25-year-old black man in July. (Twenty20)
August 15, 2018

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Citizens' groups in Nashville are demanding a thorough review of police procedures and some policy changes after release of a video of a police-shooting incident last month.

In July, 25-year-old Daniel Hambrick was shot and killed in an apartment complex when he ran from his vehicle. Black Lives Matter Nashville is among the groups that have called for change, and Mia Jaye Thomas with the group said the video confirms Hambrick did not pose a threat to the officer at the time of the shooting.

"We're told that a black person, no matter the situation, poses some severe threat to the officer, and that they are fearing for their life," she said, "even when, in the video, we see that Daniel was running away from the officer."

Metro Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson said the officer fired his weapon four times, and that three shots struck Hambrick in the back. There are reports that the officer attempted to pull Hambrick over early in the evening in the same apartment complex. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation currently is working on the case.

Thomas said the shooting is emblematic of a larger problem.

"We continue to see differences in the way that black communities are policed in comparison to the way that white communities are policed," she said.

Nashville's Police Department has been working to hire more black officers since 2016, when a survey by the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics found that around 85 percent of the force was white, while 56 percent of the population was white and a majority of the rest were black and Hispanic people.

Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - TN