PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 9, 2021 


IA reporter trial renews calls to protect press freedoms; California movement to ban new gas stations is spreading.


2021Talks - March 9, 2021 


The House votes on the American Rescue Plan, President Biden signs orders to advance gender equity, and with legislation pending to protect voting rights, pressure grows to end the Senate tactic of the filibuster.

State Moves to Reduce Methane Leaks that Fuel Climate Change

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

A new rule from the California Public Utilities Commission will require more inspections of gas distribution systems in order to reduce leaks. (Wikimedia Commons)
A new rule from the California Public Utilities Commission will require more inspections of gas distribution systems in order to reduce leaks. (Wikimedia Commons)
October 12, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO – The state's gas utility companies are going to have to spend about $300 million over the next three years to find, fix and prevent leaks of methane gas in their distribution systems – the result of a decision made by the California Public Utilities Commission on Thursday.

Methane is a pollutant and a potent greenhouse gas, linked to climate change. Tim O'Connor, senior director of the energy program in California for the Environmental Defense Fund, says right now the utilities leak or vent about 6 billion cubic feet of gas a year into the atmosphere – more than that massive blowout in Southern California almost three years ago.

"Every single year, we are leaking more gas than what was emitted during the Aliso Canyon disaster,” says O'Connor. “And so, these new sets of rules are going to reduce the leakage across the board."

O'Connor says before, utilities only had to fix the types of leaks that are a threat to public safety – and now, they'll also need to handle those that contribute to climate change.

Consumer groups have complained that the utilities will be allowed to pass their costs on to ratepayers, but O'Connor says the change to people's gas bills will be imperceptible once it is spread out over 40 million residents.

O'Connor says California is the first state to take this kind of comprehensive legal approach.

"We're going to see a reduction in methane leakage from our natural gas of 40 percent between now and 2030, and it's going to make our system environmentally safer and it's going to make it safer for the public,” says O'Connor.

He adds the system will be safer because additional inspections are designed to prevent catastrophic gas leaks and the resulting fires that have leveled entire neighborhoods in recent years.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - CA