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PNS Daily Newscast - November 21, 2018 


Senators from both sides of the aisle want Trump to clear the air on the Khashoggi killing. Also on the Wednesday rundown: Massachusetts leads the U.S. in the fentanyl-overdose death rate; plus we will let you know why business want to preserve New Mexico’s special places.

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Nebraska Kicks Off National Adoption Month with 'Instant Family' Movie

Actor Mark Wahlberg and Director Sean Anders on the set of "Instant Family." An estimated 400,000 children are in foster care at any given time in the United States. More than 100,000 of them are available to be adopted. (Paramount Pictures)
Actor Mark Wahlberg and Director Sean Anders on the set of "Instant Family." An estimated 400,000 children are in foster care at any given time in the United States. More than 100,000 of them are available to be adopted. (Paramount Pictures)
November 1, 2018

OMAHA, Neb. – "Instant Family," a new film starring Mark Wahlberg screening Thursday night in Omaha, helps kick off National Adoption Month by spotlighting the ups and downs of creating a new family through adoption.

The movie is based on real events from the life of writer-director Sean Anders, who with his wife adopted three biological siblings from foster care.

Anders says the film celebrates the notion that a family can come from anywhere.

"You know, when you first hear your kids call you 'daddy' or 'mommy,' when you first get to teach them how to ride a bike or help them figure out their math, or whatever it is,” he explains “all those little victories and all those little moments are the same wonderful moments that everybody gets from parenting."

The free screening is presented by Nebraska Children's Home Society, which supports foster parents and children and helps facilitate adoptions.

More than 6,000 Nebraska children are in foster care. To see photos and bios of some of the over 900 children still waiting for an adoptive family, look online at NebraskaHeartGallery.org.

Anders says he tapped the expertise of an actual adopted teenager to keep the film's most rebellious character authentic.

He adds the common myth that older children don't want to be adopted is really a result of the fact that most of them have been let down by adults so often in their lives.

He says when they come into your home, there's no reason for them to believe you're going to stick around, and it isn't easy to earn their trust.

"But when you get to the point of being able to actually fall in love with your kids, and feel that they're falling in love with you, and you're really becoming a family, there's nothing quite like it," he shares.

Anders says he hopes what's really just a fun night out at the movies will help lead to more kids finding families and homes.

His advice to prospective parents: don't be afraid to explore adoption as an option.

Eric Galatas, Public News Service - NE