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PNS Daily Newscast - November 21, 2018 


Senators from both sides of the aisle want Trump to clear the air on the Khashoggi killing. Also on the Wednesday rundown: Massachusetts leads the U.S. in the fentanyl-overdose death rate; plus we will let you know why business want to preserve New Mexico’s special places.

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Nebraskans Make Final Push to Get Voters to Polls

Voters who registered with The League of Women Voters' Omaha chapter will receive the last of three texts from the group as a reminder to go to the polls today and the location of their polling place. (Galatas)
Voters who registered with The League of Women Voters' Omaha chapter will receive the last of three texts from the group as a reminder to go to the polls today and the location of their polling place. (Galatas)
November 6, 2018

OMAHA, Neb. — On Election Day, voting advocates are making a final push to get registered voters to cast ballots.

The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha, which published a nonpartisan Voters Guide in English and Spanish, is making phone calls and sending texts with specific polling locations, reminding people to vote. Joanna Lindberg, Get Out the Vote committee co-chair with the league, is urging people to use their power to pick the candidates they want to make important decisions on their behalf.

"This is the one day we can select that person, and they influence our future and the future of our children and our grandchildren,” Lindberg said. “It's critical that your voice be heard."

The league's Omaha chapter registered more than 1,200 voters at more than 100 events this year, with a focus on low-voter-turnout areas and new-citizen naturalization ceremonies. They also sent nearly 1,500 reminder postcards.

Volunteer staff will be on hand today to answer questions, hook voters up with a ride to the polls, or deliver ballots as agents if people can't leave the house. To contact the league for assistance, call (402) 344-3701.

The league co-produced 16 televised candidate forums, and videos explaining the voting process in multiple languages for Omaha's refugee and immigrant communities. Lindberg’s group also worked with the Douglas County jail to provide information about voting by mail, and she noted in Nebraska, people convicted of felonies can register two years after completing probation.

"It's a huge relief to those people then who find out, 'Oh, I can vote now. I was a convicted felon but I've successfully completed my sentence and - two years later - now I'm eligible to vote,’” she said.

Power point presentations on how to register and become an informed voter were provided to area high school American Government classes. The League picked up completed forms, sent three reminder texts to each eligible student, and has already started planting seeds for getting out the vote in the next election cycle.

"Many of these youths sign pledge cards, that they might not be able to vote in this election, but they will vote in the future,” Lindberg said. “And they gave us their phone numbers, those that wanted to, and we're texting those students to remind them of their pledge."

Information on ballot issues as well as where to vote is available at vote411.org.

Eric Galatas, Public News Service - NE