Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 28, 2020 


A grim milestone as U.S. COVID-19 deaths top 100,000; and 'housing justice' advocates fear folks who lost their jobs could lose their homes.

2020Talks - May 28, 2020 


Former VP Joe Biden condemns recent police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis as yet another deadly encounter between police and an unarmed Black man. He did so before a virtual talk with PA Gov. Tom Wolf, ahead of next Tuesday's eight primaries.

Iowans with Disabilities Urged to Make Their Votes Count

Voter turnout among people with disabilities surpassed all other minority populations for the record-breaking 2018 midterm elections, according to a Rutgers University study. (futurity.org)
Voter turnout among people with disabilities surpassed all other minority populations for the record-breaking 2018 midterm elections, according to a Rutgers University study. (futurity.org)
July 12, 2019

DES MOINES, Iowa – Iowa will play a pivotal role in the selection of 2020 presidential candidates – but too often, Iowans living with disabilities just don't vote.

About 11% of Iowans report having a disability, but that figure jumps to 30% for people age 65 and older. National Disability Voter Registration Week starts Monday, July 15, an effort to make this bloc of voters more influential.

Rik Shannon, public policy manager for the Iowa Developmental Disabilities Council, says barriers faced by people with disabilities will be acknowledged during "Rev Up" week.

"'Rev Up,' stands for register, educate, vote, and use your power," says Shannon, "all of which are really applicable to a growing segment of the population. People with disability in 2020 will number about 23% of the vote."

It's estimated one in four U.S. adults has a disability. A study by Rutgers University found that if people with disabilities voted at the same rate as people without, there would be nearly 2.5 million more votes cast.

Democratic presidential hopefuls have been in Iowa for weeks, but Shannon says exposure to the candidates doesn't necessarily turn into votes. The Rutgers study showed that, although the 2018 midterm elections experienced the highest voter turnout ever among people with disabilities, a nearly 5% gap still existed between them and other registered voters.

"That was even more significant in Iowa, where we had 64 percent of people without disabilities turning out, versus only 56 percent of people with disabilities," Shannon adds. "So, that's an 8.6 percent gap."

In January next year, Democratic voters in both Iowa and Nevada will be able to caucus through their phones for the first time, after the Democratic National Committee mandated that caucuses find ways to be more inclusive.

Disclosure: Iowa Developmental Disabilities Council contributes to our fund for reporting on Disabilities, Health Issues, Mental Health. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Roz Brown, Public News Service - IA