Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 29, 2020 


More than a dozen Internal Affairs complaints against the Minneapolis Police officer involved in the death of George Floyd; we report on what's behind the current tensions.

2020Talks - May 29, 2020 


Republican Voters Against Trump just launched and plans to spend $10 million on the 2020 campaign. And President Trump signed an executive order making social media companies liable for content their users post.

Beware of Roadblocks at AZ Ballot Boxes

Some Arizonans may have to navigate regulations in order to cast a ballot - regulations critics say were designed to suppress certain types of voters. (AndreyPopov/Adobe Stock)
Some Arizonans may have to navigate regulations in order to cast a ballot - regulations critics say were designed to suppress certain types of voters. (AndreyPopov/Adobe Stock)

March 4, 2020

PHOENIX -- As Arizonans prepare for the state's March 17 Presidential Preference Election, some voters may have to navigate an obstacle or two before they can cast their ballot.

In recent years, state lawmakers have added several rules to Arizona elections that voting-rights advocates say likely are aimed at suppressing some groups of voters. Emily Kirkland, executive director of Progress Now Arizona, said just coming up with the proper type of photo identification can prevent some people from voting.

"Seniors, students, people of color, are all less likely to have that I.D.," she said, "and that means that people who are eligible are not able to participate."

Other regulations include requirements to vote only at an assigned precinct, and limiting who can drop off someone else's mail-in ballot. Conservative Republicans in the Arizona Legislature have said they passed these restrictions to preserve the integrity of the state's elections.

Kirkland alleged that state GOP lawmakers deliberately have made it harder for anyone to vote if they aren't likely to vote Republican.

"There is not an election that goes by where thousands of people are not able to participate because of restrictive laws," she said, adding that Arizonans should become educated about the rules before they vote.

Gina Roberts, voter education director for the Arizona Clean Elections Commission, said the commission can provide all the information needed to cast a ballot.

"We talk about what you need to bring with you to the polls," she said. "We've got information on when ballots are going out, when you need to return them; what to do if you didn't get your ballot -- that kind of thing."

Roberts said voters anywhere in the state can get voting instructions in both English and Spanish by calling the Clean Elections office at 877-631-8891 or online at AZCleanElections.gov/how-to-vote.

Mark Richardson, Public News Service - AZ