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PNS Daily News - October 23, 2020 


President Trump and Joe Biden square off in their final debate; warnings that "dark days" of the pandemic are yet to come; and food assistance now available for some wildfire victims.


2020Talks - October 23, 2020 


The second and last presidential debate was much more controlled than the first; President Trump keeping to his main themes, calmly rebutted by Biden.

Wisconsin Grocery Workers Seek Classification as Essential

In states such as Illinois and Maryland, reports have surfaced of grocery store workers dying after contracting COVID-19. (Adobe Stock)
In states such as Illinois and Maryland, reports have surfaced of grocery store workers dying after contracting COVID-19. (Adobe Stock)
April 13, 2020

MADISON, Wis. -- Grocery workers in Wisconsin remain on the front lines, helping people stock up during the coronavirus pandemic.

But despite showing up to work every day, a trade group says these workers are doing so without a key recognition from the state.

A handful of states, including neighboring Minnesota, have classified grocery store employees as essential -- a move that paves the way for assistance, such as free child care, during the crisis.

Brandon Scholz, president of the Wisconsin Grocers Association, is calling on Wisconsin government to do the same.

"The folks in the health care world, and first responders and law enforcement, they're also very critical to what's going on right now," he states. "But this is the time that you do add people from grocery stores in with those folks as well."

Scholz says the classification also would allow stores more access to personal protective equipment. He says store owners are ordering these items from companies that might be charging them too much, for gear that takes too long to arrive.

Scholz says customers are being more mindful of their etiquette as the crisis unfolds. He says some of the hoarding that happened in March has tapered off, but there are some things shoppers still need to keep in mind to keep everyone safe.

"Shop alone -- we'll sanitize the cart for you," he stresses. "You can sanitize if you want as well. Get your list, buy what you need and go home. And come back in a week. Buy what you need for a week -- don't buy for a day."

While some stores might be running low on various items, Scholz says there's still plenty of food to purchase. He says customers might have to adapt to being without a favorite item for a short time, but most of the shortages will not persist.

Mike Moen, Public News Service - WI