Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 9, 2020 


VP Pence backs Trump on getting kids back to school as U.S. coronavirus top 3 million: state lawmakers call for a "just" economic recovery.

2020Talks - July 8, 2020 


The Movement for Black Lives announces a new proposal to overhaul policing and invest in Black communities; NJ and DE have primary elections today; and some political candidates join in a Facebook advertising boycott.

50 Years After First Earth Day, CT Continues the Fight

Environmental groups would like to see programs that encourage owners of new buildings to go all-electric instead of relying on fossil fuels such as natural gas or heating oil. (Donnie B/Morguefile)
Environmental groups would like to see programs that encourage owners of new buildings to go all-electric instead of relying on fossil fuels such as natural gas or heating oil. (Donnie B/Morguefile)
April 22, 2020

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Today is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and, although in many ways Connecticut is greener than ever, there's still plenty of work to be done.

Since the first Earth Day in 1970, environmental laws have cut industrial pollution and introduced recycling. However, Samantha Dynowski, director of the Sierra Club in Connnecticut, said our kids' future is in trouble unless the state, nation and world do more to fight climate change.

"Our summers will be much hotter. Each heat wave will kill more people. Our shoreline will be devastated; A lot of our transportation infrastructure runs along that shoreline," she said. "The impact on human life and human health here in Connecticut will be considerable."

Connecticut has set a goal for all carbon-free power generation by 2040, but nonetheless is allowing the construction of an oil- and natural gas-fired power plant in Killingly, which Dynowski said would emit a projected 2.2 million tons of carbon into the air each year.

Emissions from power plants are only part of the climate problem. The Sierra Club is part of today's "virtual march to major insurance companies," which the group says continue to insure and invest in fossil fuels. Dynowski noted that much of the state's greenhouse-gas pollution comes from cars and trucks, but also from burning oil and gas to heat inefficient buildings.

"And so as we build all new buildings, we should have a building code that requires them to be fossil free," she said. "We simply cannot address the climate crisis without doing that."

Going forward, conservation groups also are pushing for programs to reduce single-use plastics that often end up polluting the ocean.

Information on an Earth Day virtual march is online at ctsierraclub.wixsite.com.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - CT