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PNS Daily Newscast - August 5, 2020 


A massive explosion kills dozens and injures thousands in Beirut; and child care is key to getting Americans back to work.


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Election experts testify before the US House that more funding is necessary. And Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Washington state had primaries yesterday; Hawaii and Tennessee have them later this week.

Report: Energy Dominance Puts Other Public Land Uses at Risk

Nationally, hunting generates $27 billion in consumer spending every year, and hunting and fishing-related businesses employ 438,000 people across the country. (Adobe Stock)
Nationally, hunting generates $27 billion in consumer spending every year, and hunting and fishing-related businesses employ 438,000 people across the country. (Adobe Stock)
April 24, 2020

SALIDA, Colo. -- A new report documents how the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's tilt toward extraction on public lands threatens wildlife and western sporting traditions.

The Uncompahgre Resource Management Plan in Colorado would open up 95% of the landscape there to oil and gas development.

Aaron Kindle, director of sporting advocacy with the National Wildlife Federation, says development at that scale would degrade and fragment habitat, disrupting historic migration routes and mating and birthing sites.

"It really has the potential to change hunting in the area," says Kindle. "And perhaps reduce the hunting opportunity to such a degree that hunting is really not viable in the area anymore - nor are the businesses and economies that rely on hunting in the area."

Kindle notes Delta and Montrose counties saw more than 105,000 hunter days in 2017, which played a big part in the $3.5 billion outdoor recreation economy in the area.

Proponents of the Trump administration's energy dominance policies say development on public lands is necessary for the nation's economic and energy security.

Kindle says protecting public lands for wildlife and western sporting traditions doesn't have to come at the cost of energy production. He points out that 20 million acres are already leased for oil and gas operations, and many of those acres are sitting idle.

"There's plenty of opportunity to develop energy on public lands," says Kindle. "And we really just feel like it should not be to the detriment of any and all other uses. We need to have a balanced approach, no matter what the energy dominance doctrine looks like."

And while the oil and gas industry has a boom-and-bust history, he says hunting has been around a lot longer.

If there is enough natural habitat for wildlife to thrive, Kindle says hunters will continue to visit Colorado's public lands, and spend money along the way.

Disclosure: National Wildlife Federation contributes to our fund for reporting on Climate Change/Air Quality, Endangered Species & Wildlife, Energy Policy, Environment, Public Lands/Wilderness, Salmon Recovery, Water. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Eric Galatas, Public News Service - CO