PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 30, 2020 


Trump and Biden square off in a debate marked by interruptions; COVID-19 highlights neglect of undocumented residents.


2020Talks - September 30, 2020 


Last night was filled with interruptions at the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

Tribes Sue for CARES Act Funds, Press Treasury to Act

Yurok Health and Human Services staff members Courtney Mattz and Cassandra Charles assemble weekly food boxes. (Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe)
Yurok Health and Human Services staff members Courtney Mattz and Cassandra Charles assemble weekly food boxes. (Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe)
May 4, 2020

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Two California Native American Tribes, the Yurok and the Agua Caliente, are part of a new multi-tribe lawsuit to force the U.S. Treasury to disperse $8 billion earmarked for Indian Country in the CARES Act.

The funds have been held up by another lawsuit challenging whether Alaska Native corporations, which are not federally recognized tribes, should get part of the money.

Yurok Tribe chairman Joseph L. James said COVID-19 is putting a huge strain on tribal budgets.

"We are fronting money that we don't have," James said. "We closed our economic businesses -- our hotel, our casino. So, we're taking a hit just like everybody else across America."

On Friday, a judge in the Alaska Native lawsuit ruled the funds should be disbursed. But the Treasury said in a status report that it hasn't yet determined how to allocate the money.

James said the Yurok tribe has closed the reservation to visitors to protect its rural population, which includes many older members with pre-existing conditions. The tribe is distributing food and has temporarily waived many of its members' household bills.

"For our membership, we waived our monthly water bills, our internet, our loans. We waived those for the months of April and May," he said. "Our Yurok Indian Housing Authority waived the rent. So, it's really 'all hands on deck' for us."

According to a recent study from UCLA and The University of Arizona, the rate of COVID-19 per 1,000 people is four times higher on Indian reservations compared with other parts of the country.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - CA