Thursday, September 23, 2021

Play

States are poised to help resettle Afghan evacuees who fled their home country after the U.S. military exit; efforts emerge to help Native Americans gain more clean energy independence.

Play

Sen. Mitch McConnell refuses to support raising the debt ceiling; Biden administration pledges $500 million of COVID vaccine doses globally; and U.S. military says it's taking steps to combat sexual assault.

Play

A new Oklahoma museum honors tribal nations, while Iowa's history is back on the blacktop; mixed news on COVID-19 comes with a warning about unconventional drugs; and electric cars and buses are coming to rural America.

State-Federal Cooperation Needed to Help Migrating Wildlife

Play

Monday, March 22, 2021   

SANTA FE, N.M. -- Wildlife migrations are a part of the American West's lore and history, but many of those centuries-old passages are now obstructed by the trappings of modern civilization.

There is new optimism renewed cooperation between state and federal agencies can identify and preserve seasonal migration routes in New Mexico and other states.

At a virtual forum, people from public, private and native conservation groups discussed the need for joint programs and renewed funding.

Tracy Stone-Manning, associate vice president for public lands, National Wildlife Federation, said despite each group's unique perspective, she believes it's an objective worth pursuing.

"It's going to take intense work together, and the right level of funding for all involved, to make sure that we pass along these remarkable landscapes to the future," Stone-Manning explained.

Participants cited a 2018 federal order on cooperation between federal and state officials as the key to opening blocked routes and constructing passageways to allow migrating species to bypass hazards like highways and rail lines.

Part of the optimism is driven by the Biden administration's renewed interest in protecting wildlife and endangered species.

Lesli Allison, executive director of the Santa Fe-based Western Landowners Alliance, said getting buy-in from property owners is essential to any agreement.

"In the end, the economics are going to determine the fate of these places," Allison acknowledged. "And we've got to be able to place sufficient value on the things that we want to conserve, that it's economically feasible to conserve them."

Julie Thorstenson, executive director of the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society, noted tribal interests, which have been excluded from past agreements, must be part of any future solution.

"Tribes own or influence the management of nearly 140 million acres, including more than 730,000 acres of lakes and reservoirs, 10,000 miles of streams and rivers, and 18 million acres of forest," Thorstenson outlined. "These lands provide habitat for more than 500 species listed as threatened or endangered."

The session was part of a series of forums sponsored by The Pew Charitable Trusts, the National Wildlife Federation, and the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, aimed at developing sustainable policies to preserve wildlife migrations.

Support for this reporting was provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts.


get more stories like this via email

Political canvassing across the country dropped dramatically during the 2020 election due to concerns over COVID-19 transmission via in-person door-knocking. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

LEWISBURG, W.Va. -- Political canvassers and organizers in the state are expecting they will continue to struggle with challenges to traditional …


Social Issues

FARGO, N.D. -- In the near future, North Dakota is poised to help resettle 49 Afghan evacuees who fled their home country after the U.S. military …

Environment

MCCALL, Idaho -- After the rejection of a developer's proposed land swap near Payette Lake, a coalition of groups wants the state to do the opposite…


From 2007 to 2018, Colorado state and local governments cut public health spending per resident by more than 45%. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

DENVER -- Colorado's ability to respond to COVID-19 was blunted by decades of disinvestment in critical public services, according to a new report…

Environment

GERING, Neb. -- With school back in session, many Nebraska students will be fueled by fresh beef, fruits and vegetables sourced from local farms…

The Solar Bear crew, comprised of tribal members from the Red Lake Nation, works to install 200 kilowatts of solar power on the Oshkimiijiitahdah building. (Photo courtesy of Robert Blake)

Social Issues

By Abaki Beck for Yes!Media.Broadcast version by Mike Moen for Minnesota News Connection reporting for the YES! Media-Public News Service …

Environment

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Farm bureaus and agricultural leaders of Chesapeake Bay watershed states are pushing the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fund a …

Social Issues

PHOENIX - They are irritating, they are unwanted - and now, robocalls are illegal. Consumer watchdog groups hope a looming deadline will finally …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021