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PNS Daily News - December 12, 2019 


A House Committee begins debate on articles of impeachment; Washington state is set to launch a paid family, medical leave program; advocates for refugees say disinformation clouds their case; and a new barrier to abortion in Kentucky.

2020Talks - December 12, 2019 


Today’s the deadline to qualify for this month’s debate, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang made it - the only non-white candidate who’ll be on stage. Plus, former Secretary Julián Castro questions the order of primary contests.

Archive: February 21, 2007

Hunters, fishers, and conservationists from around the state are gathering at the state Capitol today, asking lawmakers to protect Great Lakes water quality, boost land stewardship funds, and give more independence to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). David Wisnefski, a pheasant hunter f ...Read More

Montana legislators are getting a medical education today as a former H-M-O medical director explains how the current health care system is not the best for patients, doctors, or small, rural communities. Dr. Rocky White, representing the non-profit group, Working for Equality and Economic Liberati ...Read More

Montana legislators have been cynically "thanking" global warming for weather warm enough to step outside during breaks this year. At the same time, however, they are concerned about the lack of snow in the mountains. Lawmakers are proposing several bills to address the issue, such as one that enc ...Read More

Tens of thousands of hungry Minnesotans are not receiving the taxpayer-funded food assistance earmarked for them, according to a new report. The assistance amounts to nearly $2 million per year. Author Jessica Webster, with the Legal Services Advocacy Project, says the state has failed these peopl ...Read More

A "first of its kind" report on fatherhood finds a shift in Minnesota families away from traditional roles. Author Glenn Palm, at St. Cloud State, says the report demonstrates the change underway in the definition of being a dad as more women with high-paying jobs become "providers" and an increasi ...Read More

85 percent of Americans say prescription prices are "too high," according to new research from AARP. The survey also shows Americans like the idea of banding together to negotiate for better prices, something they say they want to see done for Medicare. Steve Gorin, with the New Hampshire Chapter ...Read More

Buy in bulk, and usually, things are cheaper. It's a business practice that 86% of Americans would like to see the U.S. adopt for the Medicare prescription program, according to a new AARP survey. Congress is looking at allowing bulk buys and negotiation for Medicare meds. Right now, the practice i ...Read More

The U.S. Senate will soon vote on a plan that would allow Medicare to use its buying power to barter for lower drug prices, and a new survey commissioned by AARP finds more than 85 percent of Americans in favor of the plan. Currently, Medicare is legally barred from negotiating prescription prices, ...Read More

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