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PNS Daily Newscast - February 21, 2019 


Signs that the Mueller Trump/Russia probe could wrap up in the next week. Also on our Thursday rundown: A death penalty repeal likely to pass in New England. Plus, cancer survivors rally for tougher smoking laws in Tennessee.

Daily Newscasts

Archive: August 11, 2014

PHOTO: The childhood immunization rate in Kentucky slipped a few percentage points from 2011 to 2012, and state health officials say it is now a priority to make some changes. Photo by Greg Stotelmyer.

FRANKFORT, Ky. - The state of Kentucky has laws requiring immunizations for students in child care and school, but that doesn't mean there's full participation. Most recent data shows the immunization rate dropped in 2012. Kentucky's deputy commissioner for public health, Dr. Kraig Humbaugh, calls ...Read More

PHOTO: Cyclists and walkers are moving closer to transforming the defunct Rock Island rail corridor into a trail, as a decision to sell a key portion of the corridor is expected soon. Photo courtesy of Missouri Rock Island Trail, Inc.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Plans to transform a defunct stretch of railroad into a second cross-state bicycle-and-walking path are picking up speed, and could be finalized within the next few weeks. Brent Hugh, executive director of the Missouri Bicycle and Pedestrian Federation, said turning the Rock Isl ...Read More

PHOTO: A new report from the Wisconsin Budget Project says state legislators are shortchanging the public and hampering the state's growth by giving tax cuts to the wealthy and stripping investments to education and health care. Photo courtesy Wis. Budget Project.

MADISON, Wis. – The future of economic progress in Wisconsin is being questioned in a new report from the Wisconsin Budget Project, which shows state lawmakers may be hindering the tradition of investing in education and other assets that contribute to business growth and development. Resear ...Read More

PHOTO: An Ohio doctor says going back to school can cause headaches for some children, with an estimated 10 percent of school-aged children experiencing them periodically. Photo credit: stockarch/morguefile.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Going back to school after summer break can quite literally be a headache for some Ohio children. Dr. Nick DeBlasio, a pediatrician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, says about 10 percent of school-aged children and more than 15 percent of teens experience pe ...Read More

PHOTO: Graham Nash, of Crosby Stills and Nash, fears America has been divided into a nation of

NEW YORK - "It's time for a revolution," says Graham Nash, of Crosby, Stills, and Nash, who fears for an America that's become divided into "haves and have-nothings." The outspoken musician and activist was in New York talking about some of the views expressed in an autobiography that time-travels ...Read More

PHOTO: The number of Arizonans applying for temporary legal status through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is the highest in the nation, according to the Migration Policy Institute. Photo courtesy New York State Office for New Americans.

PHOENIX – Arizona leads the nation for its percentage of applicants for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA program, according to a new study by the Migration Policy Institute. DACA can provide temporary legal status for some undocumented immigrants. Jeanne Batalova is seni ...Read More

PHOTO: New Gallup research shows the number of people without health insurance in New Mexico has dropped sharply since the Affordable Care Act took effect on Jan. 1, 2014. Photo courtesy of The White House.

SANTA FE, N.M. – The number of people who don't have health insurance in New Mexico has dropped by 5 percent since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) started at the first of the year, according to a recent Gallup poll. The research shows the state's uninsured rate fell from 20 percent to 15 perce ...Read More

PHOTO: According to the Center for Rural Affairs, rural areas have higher percentages of households receiving SNAP benefits than urban areas or small cities. Photo credit: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture/Flickr.

ST. PAUL, Minn. – Oftentimes, the issue of hunger is associated with people in inner cities, where the cost of living tends to be high. But a new study shows some of the greatest need can be found where America's food supply is grown and raised. Jon Bailey, director of rural public policy p ...Read More

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