Newscasts

PNS Daily News- February 15, 2019 


Shutdown averted and a national emergency declaration; A push in Iowa for virtual caucus attendance for 2020 primaries; and concerns about legislation that could hide oil pipeline records. Those stories and more in today’s news.

Daily Newscasts

Archive: April 28, 2015

Wyomingites killed or injured at work are being honored today in the Capitol Rotunda for Workers' Memorial Day. Credit: Equality State Policy Center.

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Wyoming workers who have been killed or injured on the job are being honored at a ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda this Tuesday morning. Wyoming is ranked 49th for its high rate of deaths per 100,000 workers, and has consistently ranked among the worst in the country for several yea ...Read More

PHOTO: Toxins in Great Lakes fish are on the rise, and health and environmental advocates are concerned that proposed revisions to the Toxic Substances Control Act would actually roll back some protections, and give states less power to deal with the problem. Photo credit: Jason Gillman/Morguefile.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. - The federal law designed to protect the public from toxic chemicals is getting an update, but some say it doesn't go far enough, and could actually put Michigan families at risk. Andy Igrejas, director of the watchdog group Safer Chemicals Healthy Families, says most people are a ...Read More

PHOTO: A proposal to reform the nation's toxic chemical laws does not go far enough to protect the public, and could roll back some important protections currently in place, according to safety and environmental advocates. Photo credit: Andy Beecroft/Wikimedia Commons.

DENVER - The chemical industry is backing new legislation in the U.S. Senate to reform the way chemicals are regulated. Its proponents say it's time to loosen some of the current restrictions on chemicals, many of which show up in such everyday products as plastics and vinyl flooring. However, cons ...Read More

PHOTO: The University of Tennessee Extension estimates Tennessee's bee population has declined by as much as 50 percent in recent years. Photo credit: Butkovicdub/Morguefile.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee honey bees are feeling the sting of a variety of environmental factors. According to estimates from the University of Tennessee Extension, bees have seen as much as 50 percent of their population decline in recent years. Professor John Skinner, an apiculturist at the U ...Read More

Photo: Research from Duke University finds that charter schools in North Carolina disproportionately benefit white students. Photo credit: jdurham/morguefile.com

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - With the state lifting its cap on charter schools in recent years and 147 charter schools now open in North Carolina, new research from Duke University questions which students the schools are really benefitting. Researcher Helen Ladd, a professor in Duke's Sanford School of Pub ...Read More

PHOTO: Much larger than lawn gnomes, these majestic visitors to a Spokane home prompted residents to call the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Photo credit: Candace Bennett, WDFW.

SPOKANE, Wash. - "Moose on the Loose" is the aptly-named title of some free presentations in the Spokane area in the next month, starting tonight. It isn't the only area of Washington where people have to learn to coexist with moose, but the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Spokane ...Read More

IMAGE: Public health advocates, environmental groups and chemical workers' unions all say an industry-backed bill changing the way the federal government regulates dangerous chemicals doesn't do enough to protect Pennsylvania families. Image credit: Wikimedia.

HERMITAGE, Pa. - An industry-backed bill changing the way the federal government regulates dangerous chemicals won't do enough to protect Pennsylvania families, a coalition of consumer watchdogs say. Senate Bill 697, also known as the Vitter-Udall bill, is being considered by a Senate committee  ...Read More

PHOTO: Public health advocates, environmental groups and chemical workers' unions say an industry-backed bill, S 697, changing the way the federal government regulates dangerous chemicals, would do nothing to prevent chemical spills such as the one that brought protesters to the State Capitol last year. Photo credit: Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - An industry-backed bill changing the way the federal government regulates dangerous chemicals wouldn't do enough to protect West Virginia families, watchdogs say. The Vitter-Udall bill now being considered by a Senate committee is drawing criticism from public health advocates, ...Read More

1 of 2 pages   1 2 >  Last »