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PNS Daily Newscast - February 21, 2019 


Signs that the Mueller Trump/Russia probe could wrap up in the next week. Also on our Thursday rundown: A death penalty repeal likely to pass in New England. Plus, cancer survivors rally for tougher smoking laws in Tennessee.

Daily Newscasts

Archive: September 29, 2015

A public health expert told Kentucky community leaders that making their towns healthier is about much more than just doctors and medicine. Credit: Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky.

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. – A nationally-known public health expert on Monday told community leaders from across Kentucky that education provides the biggest opportunity to make their communities healthier places to live. Dr. Tony Iton, a physician who oversees a 10-year, multimillion-dollar effort ...Read More

Pennsylvania is the second largest natural gas producing state in the country. Credit: Ruhrfisch/Wikimedia Commons.

PITTSBURGH – Proposed rules on methane emissions are a good start, but don't go far enough. That's the message from environmentalists to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In comments to the agency at a public hearing in Pittsburgh today, advocates say the rules as written would not ap ...Read More

Commercial office cleaners in many eastern U.S. cities are currently negotiating new contracts. Courtesy: SEIU Local 32BJ.

PHILADELPHIA – As many as 2,000 janitors will converge on Philadelphia on Wednesday to rally for what they consider good jobs and fair contracts. More than 75,000 office cleaners from Massachusetts to Virginia are bargaining for contracts this year. Juanita Acree, a member of local 32BJ of th ...Read More

The state recommends North Carolinians have first aid supplies in their emergency kit. Credit: wallyir/morguefile.com

RALEIGH, N.C. – With much of the state under heavy downpours and storm watches over the weekend, the state Office of Emergency Management is reminding people about the importance of being prepared. September is North Carolina Preparedness Month and OME spokeswoman Julia Jarema says it's easy ...Read More

Research from Children's Mercy Hospital in Kanasas City and other facilities holds promise for extreme preterm infants. Credit: Chris Hall/Wikimedia Commons.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – It's good news for the tiniest and most vulnerable among us. Thanks to changes in care practices and other advances, survival rates for extreme preterm infants – sometimes called "micro preemies" – are on the rise. The study from the National Institutes of Healt ...Read More

Mental and physical health and a person's lifestyle choices are so closely linked that some clinics are adding behavioral health services, funded by CareOregon. Credit: Amanda Mills/CDC.
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PORTLAND, Ore. – CareOregon is making a $7 million investment to add staff and more behavioral health services to some of the clinics in its provider network. Mental health services have traditionally been separate from other types of health care, but that is changing. The idea behind a Coor ...Read More

About 78,000 Idahoans still lack health insurance because of the state's reluctance to accept federal Medicaid funding. Credit: Parenting Upstream/Pixabay.

ALBION, Idaho – Seventy-eight thousand Idahoans are still waiting for affordable health insurance. If Idaho "closed the gap" and accepted federal Medicaid funding, Gem State residents would be able to purchase coverage. It's a move a governor's task force has recommended, but the Legislature h ...Read More

As the U.S. Senate prepares to debate the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act, members of the New England Farmers Union say transparent labeling is in the best interest of both farmers and consumers. Courtesy: NEFU.

CONCORD, N.H. – It already passed the U.S. House, but there is no stopping the debate over whether the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act really does inform New England consumers about GMO food. Kate Snyder, director of membership and programs with the New England Farmers Union, says it's ha ...Read More

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