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PNS Daily Newscast - August 7, 2020 


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North Dakotans Trying to “Move the Ball” on Climate Change

September 25, 2009

FARGO, N.D. - Cap-and-trade legislation seems to have moved to the back burner in Congress for now, but some North Dakotans are trying to get the ball rolling again. Most polls show a majority of Americans continue to support climate change legislation, which supporters say would control pollution that causes global warming and create a new generation of clean energy jobs.

Jason Schafer, North Dakota representative for the National Wildlife Federation, says, just last week, some North Dakota citizens took time out of their busy day to visit Sen. Conrad's office.

"They went there just to quickly pop in and show their support for an energy and climate bill being passed in Congress this year. Then, a couple of those people came out to Washington, D.C. this week and they had a chance to meet with Sen. Dorgan, and then they met with Sen. Conrad's staff. "

North Dakotans understand what is at stake, Schafer says, if issues of climate change and energy independence aren't addressed now.

"We know there is a lot of support in North Dakota for Congress to take action on energy and climate and people agree with Boone Pickens that we can't go another 40 years without an energy plan."

Opponents of the cap-and-trade plan argue it's artificial market for emissions allowances would raise energy prices for consumers while failing to control pollution. However, an analysis by the Center for American Progress Action Fund found provisions in the bill designed to offset those increases would actually reduce energy bills and, at the same time, could create up to 137,000 jobs in the renewable energy sector alone by 2015.




Dick Layman, Public News Service - ND