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PNS Daily Newscast - August 12, 2020 


Former VP Joe Biden picks Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate; some schools have science-based metrics for open classroom instruction.


2020Talks - August 12, 2020 


California Sen. Kamala Harris will be on the ticket with Joe Biden in November. Four states had primaries yesterday, and two had runoffs. Georgia and Wisconsin appear to have improved since last time.

Birth Control: "Preventive" Health Care or Not?

November 3, 2010

MINNEAPOLIS - Most women spend about 30 years of their lives using birth control, and that fact is part of the basis of a study being undertaken by the Institute of Medicine to help decide if prescription methods of birth control can be considered preventive care, and thus be eligible for purchase without a co-pay.

Kathi Di Nicola of Planned Parenthood Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, says their national organization conducted a recent study that shows overwhelming public support for birth control coverage.

"The vast majority of all voters support access to birth control under health care reform. Seventy-seven percent of Catholic women voters said that it should be covered, 71 percent of all voters, seven-in-10 Republicans, so it's something that the vast majority of mainstream Americans support."

Planned Parenthood is asking women to speak out in favor of the coverage. U.S. Catholic bishops are opposing any requirement to cover contraceptives or sterilization as preventive care, saying that pregnancy is not an illness.

Di Nicola argues the issue is ultimately a matter of women's health.

"Fully covering prescription birth control make medical sense. We see women in our clinics every day that can't afford basic birth control. Women that are looking to plan their families and plan their futures and we know that planned families are healthier families."

She adds making birth control available at no cost makes it possible for women to use the method that works best for them, and reduces the rate of unintended pregnancies.

Sharon Rolenc, Public News Service - MN