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Gov. Quinn Tries to 'Set Record Straight' at DNC

PHOTO: Gov. Pat Quinn addressing the Democratic National Convention. Photo credit: Stephanie Carroll Carson.
PHOTO: Gov. Pat Quinn addressing the Democratic National Convention. Photo credit: Stephanie Carroll Carson.
September 5, 2012

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Democrats have been defending President Obama's record on health reform, welfare and jobs at the Democratic National Convention. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn was one of the first.

Quinn told the delegates that the Republican attacks on the president were untrue, and gave Obama credit for saving the auto industry.

"When President Obama took office, the Chrysler plant in Belvedere, Ill., employed just 200 people, and today that same Chrysler plant is employing more than 4,000 American workers."

Democrats credited Obama with creating 4.5 million private-sector jobs, but stressed that he needed more time to fix the economy because it was in such bad shape when he took office.

Quinn accused the Republicans of making up charges during their convention about Obama's record on welfare.

"They went on and on, pretending that our president weakened its work requirements. Now, everyone knows that that is a ridiculous charge."

Obama has told reporters that his administration agreed to give states some flexibility in how they manage their welfare rolls as long as it prompted more people to find work - and that the change was in response to requests from five governors, including two Republicans.

Democrats say the president needs one more term to repair an inherited recession that was the worst since the Great Depression.

Mary Anne Meyers, Public News Service - IL