Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Play

Public health experts are concerned many kids have missed important checkups and vaccinations, and a third DC Police officer who responded to the January 6 insurrection takes his own life.

Play

The White House calls for states to rescue renters, Senators dissect a massive infrastructure plan, and both the White House and Congress are losing approval in the eyes of voters.

Fewer Screens, More “Free-Range Children”

Play

Tuesday, April 30, 2013   

PLAINVIEW, N.Y. - This is Screen-Free Week, an annual effort by children's advocates to get kids free from the grip of electronic devices, even if only for a few days. Started in 1996 as "TV Turnoff," it's now hosted by the Boston-based Campaign for Commercial Free Childhood (CCFC) and promoted by dozens of groups around the country.

According to Toni Riedel, communications director at the New York-based Early Years Institute, the idea is to get kids' noses out of Nintendos, Play Stations, smart phones, tablets and TVs and get them to read, explore nature, spend time with friends and family, or just go outside and play.

"Y'know, when we were young, we were outside playing," Riedel recalled. "We were what's called 'free-range children.' Today, kids are tied to screens. You know, we're in such a technology-oriented society."

Some studies show that on average preschoolers spend 32 hours a week enthralled by screened entertainment, the CCFC said.

Dr. Susan Linn, director of the CCFC, said that when her group took over hosting "TV Turnoff Week" three years ago, they changed the name because TV wasn't the only "bad guy" anymore.

"It's not even that screens are necessarily 'bad guys' - except for babies - but it's just that there's too much of them in our lives and way too much of them in children's lives, and it's important to take a break," she declared.

Toni Riedel pointed out that for children from birth to at least age two, every week should be screen-free.

"The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: children under two - no screen media, no television."

Susan Linn said that when families are out with restless kids at restaurants and other public places, mobile screens are too often shoved in the children's faces by parents, just to keep them quiet.

"They could bring books, or they could bring crayons, little things that will occupy them if it's really too hard for them to sit for long periods of time," she suggested.

Adults are also encouraged to take the pledge to swear off TV and DVDs for a week, and only use the computer if it's required for work.

To take the pledge, and to get more information and materials, do an Internet search for "Screen-Free Week." Yes, you'll have to use a screen one more time - but you, and your children, may be better off for it.






get more stories like this via email

The commission charged with drawing Ohio's 99 House and 33 Senate districts meets this week. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- New congressional and legislative maps will soon start to take shape in Ohio. The Ohio Redistricting Commission convenes for the …


Social Issues

DENVER -- Today marks the day Black women in the U.S. will finally earn as much as a white, non-Hispanic man was paid in 2020. Ashley Panelli…

Environment

CHICAGO -- As Illinois residents get ready for more high temperatures this August, utility watchdogs are urging people to practice energy efficiency …


Chronic wasting disease can be transmitted between deer, along with food and soil contaminated by bodily fluids. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

WARREN, Pa. -- A temporary animal-feeding ban is being proposed for the Allegheny National Forest after a captive deer tested positive for chronic …

Social Issues

LOS ANGELES -- Hunger-fighting advocacy groups are speaking out in California, drawing attention to the continuing problem of food insecurity…

Normanton Farms is joining one of the Agrarian Trust's 13 Commons across 12 different states. (Normanton Farms)

Environment

LITCHFIELD, N.H. -- A 63-acre parcel of land along the Merrimack River is becoming part of the New Hampshire Agrarian Commons. The property, known as …

Social Issues

RICHMOND, Va. - Virginia's General Assembly Special Session begins today to budget more than $4 billion in federal COVID relief funds, and advocates …

Social Issues

ROSLINDALE, Mass. - A new report finds Massachusetts residents would rather repair electronic devices than send them to landfills, but manufacturers …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021