PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 19, 2920 


Trailing Biden in Nevada, Trump holds a jam-packed Carson City rally. And with COVID a major election issue, hospitals help patients register to vote.


2020Talks - October 19, 2020 


Litigation is ongoing on ballot receipt deadlines, witness signatures and drop boxes. And early voting starts in a dozen states this week.

Renters vs. Landlords: New Law Offers New Recourse

PHOTO: A new Virginia law means tenants have new legal recourse against landlords who illegally evict them. Photo credit: Microsoft Images
PHOTO: A new Virginia law means tenants have new legal recourse against landlords who illegally evict them. Photo credit: Microsoft Images
July 12, 2013

RICHMOND, Va. – Renters in Virginia have new recourse against landlords who illegally evict them.

A new state law now allows tenants who've been locked out of their homes to file a simple form in General District Court to get back in, instead of pursuing a more complicated legal process that had been in effect.

"It's a huge win for renters,” says Christie Marra, an attorney with the Virginia Poverty Law Center. “It means they have real access to justice in these cases where landlords clearly are violating the law."

The General Assembly unanimously approved the new legal option for tenants this year, but Marra is concerned not enough renters know about it.

She says landlords are required to go to court to get a tenant evicted, but too often take matters into their own hands.

"There have been successful efforts by landlords over the years to evict tenants more quickly by either changing the locks to their doors, or by cutting off some essential service like water or gas or electricity that provides heat," she says.



Alison Burns, Public News Service - VA